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Persian: نون نکش آب لوله کش

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by seitt, Jan 12, 2013.

  1. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Hi,

    What does نون نکش آب لوله کش mean, please?

    Any extra kasres?

    Best wishes, and many thanks,

    Simon
     
  2. darush Senior Member

    سلام
    برای من اصلا مفهوم نیست. لطفا متنِ اصلی را بنویسید
    لوله کش: Pipe fitter
     
  3. searcher123

    searcher123 Senior Member

    My home ;-) /The Persian Gulf
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    There is not any Kasre. It is an old proverb that is not so common at the present and is used as an irony for "lazy people". This proverb mean "از جاي خودت اصلا تكان نخور آدم تنبل! من نان برات مي‌آورم، آب را هم با لوله مي‌كشم دم دهنت كه مجبور نشوي يك وقت تكان بخوري"

    نون نكش (Noon Nakesh) = نان با خودت حمل نكن
     
  4. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Thank you so much - Turkish has the following, which I think is the equivalent: Armut piş ağzıma düş!

    Meaning: "Pear, ripen (and) fall into my mouth!" Again, extreme laziness is being expressed.

    Btw, "plumber" is probably the best equivalent of لوله کش when it refers to a profession.

    PS Many thanks to dear Morteza for the helpful advice about my unintentional duplication of this thread.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2013
  5. searcher123

    searcher123 Senior Member

    My home ;-) /The Persian Gulf
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    Well, we have an exact equivalent for "Pear, ripen (and) fall into my mouth!" too: هلو، برو تو گلو. The main meaning of this proverb is "it is really easy/occasion", but you can use it as a ironic proverb to pointing to a "lazy person" too.

    For example:
    همه كارهاش را انجام دادم. هلو برو تو گلوئه! فقط كافيه امضاش كني و تموم
    امروز قراره يه معامله بكنم هلو برو تو گلو! هم بي‌دردسر، هم پر سود

    An example in its ironic meaning:
    يه كم كونتو تكون نديا! همه چي بايد هلو برو تو گلو باشه برات؟
    زندگي سختي داره، براش بايد تلاش كني. كسي كه دنبال كار هلو برو تو گلو مي‌گرده، هيچي گيرش نمياد
     
  6. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Many thanks, wonderful examples!

    Please may I check the exact pronunciation of "هلو برو تو گلو" with you?
     
  7. searcher123

    searcher123 Senior Member

    My home ;-) /The Persian Gulf
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    You are welcome my dear friend.
    Hooloo Boro Too Geloo
     
  8. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Thank you so much - how interesting that هلو is pronounced as if written هولو.
     
  9. searcher123

    searcher123 Senior Member

    My home ;-) /The Persian Gulf
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    Yes, it is pronounced as هولو in colloquial. But some people, especially educated people maybe pronounce it as "Holoo" too, however, it is rare.
     
  10. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Much obliged, God bless.
     
  11. darush Senior Member

    Thank you.
    تنبل نرو به سایه
    سایه خودش میایه(می آید)ا
     
  12. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    You are most welcome, God bless.
     
  13. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Coming back to this delightful thread after a while, I'd like to ask if you could please translate نون نکش آب لوله کش fairly literally for me so I can see how the grammar works. Is the idea behind آب لوله کش that the water is laid on by a pipe to the other person's mouth, or rather that this is what he expects? Perhaps you can therefore use آب لوله کش for "running water", although I imagine there would have to be a kasre after آب.
     
  14. searcher123

    searcher123 Senior Member

    My home ;-) /The Persian Gulf
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    Yes, it have exactly the same meaning.

    At the present, the water that is laid on by a pipe is called آب لوله‌كشي. At this proverb it is used as آب لوله كش just because of rhythm, but its meaning is as the same as آب لوله‌كشي شده از مكاني به مكان ديگر
     
  15. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Ah, thank you so much - so, strictly speaking, it's not grammatical, is it?

    This is called poetic licence in English - in poetry, the rules of grammar are sometimes ignored in favour of a nice effect. I think "poetic licence" must exist in all languages and cultures.
     
  16. searcher123

    searcher123 Senior Member

    My home ;-) /The Persian Gulf
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    yes, of course. You are right completely.
     
  17. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Much obliged, God bless!
     

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