Persian: I went for wool and came back shorn.

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by seitt, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Greetings,

    “I went for wool and came back shorn.”
    Do you have a proverb like this?

    This is used when you try to get something you want but come back having lost what you had: the verb “shear – sheared – shorn” means “to cut off the wool of a sheep”. For a human being it means “to give somebody a haircut” but is only used jokingly in this sense.

    بهش مي‌گي برو كلاه بيار، مي‌ره سر مياره is very close, but what do you say when it happens to you yourself?

    Best wishes, and many thanks,

    Simon
     
  2. searcher123

    searcher123 Senior Member

    My home ;-) /The Persian Gulf
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    I think the best equivalent to it is دست از پا درازتر برگشتن. For example:


    اوّلي: بالاخره موّفق شدي طلبت را از يارو پس بگيري؟
    دوّمي: نه بابا! تا مي‌فهمه دارم مي‌رم سراغش، خودشو توي هفت تا سوراخ قايم مي‌كنه! خانمش گفت نيست و دوباره دست از پا درازتر برگشتم




    No, that is completely different. بهش مي‌گي برو كلاه بيار، مي‌ره سر مياره is used when you want to say a person will done your order much more severer than your order.

    For example suppose that you are a sheriff. A person will call you about a contention in front of his home. You will order one of your polices to arrest both of them and bring them to the police station. You know the police man is very rude, so you will say: دوباره نري جاي كلاه، سر بياري!ا (i.e. I just told you to arrest them; healthy and alive. Don't kill them, don't injure them and don't does any other bad action on them!).

    Or suppose that you will send a benignant police to the mission. The rude police will criticize you why you didn't send him to the mission? And you will answer: براي اين كه هر وقت فرستادمت بري كلاه بياري، رفتي ﴿جاش﴾ سر آوردي!ا
     
  3. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Thank you so much, a truly excellent explanation.
     
  4. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    How about the following? Do you think it fits?
    آمد ابرو را درست کند، چشم هم کور شد
     
  5. searcher123

    searcher123 Senior Member

    My home ;-) /The Persian Gulf
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    It is a different proverb. This proverb mean: he tried to improve a bad situation, but he made the situation worse!
     
  6. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Many thanks, all clear now.
     
  7. aisha93

    aisha93 Senior Member

    Arabic/Persian(larestani)
    Hello, there is an Arabic proverb which is very similar (not equivalent) to the English one you wrote, it says: رَجَعَ بِخُفّی حُنَین (literally: he came back with Hunein's pair of sandal).
    I found its Persian translation here, and at the end it says that is it an equivalent to دست از پا دراز تر برگشت

    Here is the Original Arabic version
     
  8. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Many thanks, it's most interesting to be able to compare the two.
     
  9. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Oh, by the way, آمد ابرو را درست کند، چشم هم کور ش is in the third person i.e. it's used of another person.

    So how can we say, "I went for wool but came back shorn", please? (Assuming that that's the best translation, which I think it is.)

    Simply آمدم ابرويش را درست كنم، ﴿زدم﴾ چشمش را هم كور كردم.? Or doesn't it change for person?
     
  10. searcher123

    searcher123 Senior Member

    My home ;-) /The Persian Gulf
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    It is correct completely. Other tenses:
    آمد ابرويم را درست كند، ﴿زد﴾ چشمم را هم كور كرد
    رفتم ابرويش را درست كنم، ﴿زدم﴾ چشمش را هم كور كردم
    آمد ابرويمان را درست كند، ﴿زد﴾ چشممان را هم كور كرد

    and so on
     
  11. seitt Senior Member

    Turkey
    English/Welsh
    Many thanks for a truly complete answer.
     

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