personne mise en cause

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by judec, Apr 16, 2008.

  1. judec Senior Member

    UK English
    I am doing a legal translation of various documents, one of which is a police statement at the top of which it has

    PERSONNE MISE EN CAUSE

    Does this mean the "person involved in case", the "implicated person", the "challenged person" or is there some set phrase.

    It is a standalone phrase so there is not really any more context, apart from the fact that the statement is as a result of a challenge to a decision made.

    Hope someone can help. Thanks.
     
  2. judec Senior Member

    UK English
    Sorry, I should qualify that by saying that it is a statement made to the police as part of a preliminary inquiry rather than a police statement!
     
  3. lolalorr Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English - American
    A bit late but how about something like "the party at fault", "the accused" or "the alleged perpetrator"?
     
  4. Aoyama Senior Member

    川崎市、巴里 (黎)
    仏(佛)法語צרפתית Clodoaldien
    In fact
    is correct already.
    is close but different because it implies already the concept of "guilt", which is not yet decided (ruled).
     
  5. lolalorr Senior Member

    Paris, France
    English - American
    Aoyama, I'd agree with you if we were talking about "mise en cause" in a legal case (third party involvement). But in this case, we're talking about a person who is named as the alleged perpetrator of a crime in a police report. If the person is being named in a police report, the police ARE presuming that the person is guilty. Perhaps "party at fault" is making an advance judgment, but I believe that "the accused" and "the alleged perpetrator" are appropriate in this instance.
     
  6. Aoyama Senior Member

    川崎市、巴里 (黎)
    仏(佛)法語צרפתית Clodoaldien
    Well, I beg to differ here, as "personne mise en cause" is different from "suspect".It is true that "mise en cause", from "mettre en cause", implies a certain degree of "involvement" that could very well lead to indictment, but that can only appear in a secondary report. Here, we are talking about a preliminary report, which probably exposes the fact without drawing any conclusion(s).
     

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