Pillarbiters, pillarkissers...

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by ThomasK, Dec 26, 2012.

  1. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Those are literal translations of a Dutch (pilaarbijter) and an Italian word (baciapile) referring to extremely devout people. Do you have some word for those people in your language?

    I have also heard of a 'grenouille de bénitier' in French, the holy-water stoup frog. More like that please...
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2012
  2. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    hebrew:
    אָדוּק, קַנַּאי; כֵּן, רְצִינִי
    from right to left aduk, kanay [ =ideology,religion related]; ken [ =honest, straight{=truth, more than trustworthy, that he is and his actions and thoughts are all tautology} person], retzini [=serious].
     
  3. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Would you have a very precise translation of those words? Do they refer to actors, people doing something? And/or are they funny ? ;-) I am not looking for equivalents of ideological hardliners though.
     
  4. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    1)What do you mean very precise translation of those words?
    2)what ....funny?
    3)what are you looking for then?
     
  5. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    I just meant that I do not know what 'aduk', and 'kanay' for example mean. Are they adjectives for example? They seem to be, but I had expected a noun (-er in English), or a metaphor (and those can be funny like the ones above). You see?
     
  6. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    they all can be both noun and adjective(though not together - either that or that) depending on the context/place in sentence.
    why would they be metaphors?
    perhaps if youll explain what you mean by devout i could help more.
     
  7. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    OK. 'Devout' means extremely religious, performing all knds of rituals, but perhaps not with the right mindset (the motivation may be based on what others think [of them], not on a straight relation with God/gods/.... They might be, are sometimes viewed as hypocritical. Adn when people have negative feelings/ misgivings about something or someone, they often turn to metaphors to 'evoke' their ideas, or no, feelings. You see?
     
  8. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    oh, we dont, what we do have is what you said but when they are on a straight relation with god/gods/ideology and motivated by it and not by society's view
     
  9. Perseas Senior Member

    Athen
    Griechisch
    Greek:

    -πιστός /pi'stos/ : adjective and in religious contexts it means the believer ; it has no negative connotation -- < οι πιστοί /i pi'sti/ = the faithful, the believers >
    -θρήσκος /'θriskos/ :adjective meaning a devout, religious person with no negative connotation -- < θρησκεία /θri'skia/ = religion>
    -θρησκόληπτος /θri'skoliptos/ : compound adjective meaning the religious zealot, churchy. Its second part "-ληπτος" comes from the verb λαμβάνω meaning to take. θρησκόληπτος is sometimes related to superstition.
     
  10. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    I see, but no words to point out some kind of hypocrisy (or naivité)?
     
  11. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    If we want to point hypocrisy or naivite we have words for that, remember hebrew is a dense language, and for each invoke-need there exists a word
     
  12. Perseas Senior Member

    Athen
    Griechisch
    You 're right as to "πιστός" and "θρήσκος", but "θρησκόληπτος" (as I said) is related to superstition and you can pinpoint sort of naivité there. "θρησκοληψία" (the noun) also renders a religious mania, an exaggeration in religious matters.
     
  13. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    I found some more in Italian, but they're fairly general, and not metaphorical: bigoto (bigot of course), but also tartufo (truffle, don't know why).
     
  14. bibax Senior Member

    Czech
    Czech:

    pánbíčkář (m.), pánbíčkářka (f.) from pánbíček, a funny diminutive of Pán Bůh (Herr Gott);

    svíčková bába = literally: candle (related) old woman (old biddy);
     
  15. Tamar

    Tamar Senior Member

    Israel, Hebrew
    Thomas, I see Tartuffo is the name of Molier's Tartuffe in Italian. And as much as I recall, Tartuffe was a devout (exactly as you describe in post #7 - extremely religious and a total hypocrite). Maybe that's the connection?
     
  16. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    That might be quite right, Tamar, thanks!

    And the two Czech words are nice...
     
  17. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    Also a pejorative name (borderline offensive) is «θεούσος» [θe'usos] (masc.) and «θεούσα» [θe'usa] (fem.) which desribes the person demonstrating not only an exaggeration in religious matters, but also an abnormal piety (to the point of hypocricy). Compound, masc. noun «θεός» [θe'os] --> god (PIE base *dʰ(e)h₁s-, god) + Classical fem. participle of verb «εἰμὶ» (to be), «οὖσα»
     

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