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Play safe

Discussion in 'English Only' started by mimi2, Mar 29, 2006.

  1. mimi2 Senior Member

    vietnam vietnamese
    " It's often better to play safe in exams than to be original."
    I don't understand with what meaning people use "play safe". Thanks for your explanation. Can they express with another way?
     
  2. nichec

    nichec Senior Member

    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    To "play safe" means to be conservative, traditional, to "play by the rules". Thus the sentence means that it's better not to have any bold move when you are doing an exam.

    Well, I don't really agree with this sentence, but I hope you can understand it better now.
     
  3. Nevermore Senior Member

    England
    British English, England
    To "play safe" is just not to take risks. In the context of a language examination, this might mean not attempting to use sentence constructions that you're not 100% certain of, because of the risks involved.

    Therefore an alternative way to express this sentence might be "It can often be better to keep things simple in exams than to be original"

    Hope that helps!
     
  4. mimi2 Senior Member

    vietnam vietnamese
    Thanks nichec and nevermore very much.
     
  5. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    I say "play it safe." :confused:
     
  6. Roshini Senior Member

    Malaysia
    Its better to play safe rather to be sorry at the end.
    It also means to be on the safe side rather than to take things into your own hands.
     
  7. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Adding to the explanations above, I think this is very sound advice.
    Your purpose in the exam is to pass, not to change the world - leave that for tomorrow:)

    You should know what is expected of you to pass.

    In a history exam, you will know how the course was taught, you may well know the views of the examiner. You may have original views on the questions in the exam, but if you know that these would be considered juvenile fantasies by the examiner, you would be better to play safe and either pick another question or present the answer most likely to meet with the examiners approval.

    So, in an English exam, although you are totally convinced that the future lies in the overwhelming dominance of textspeak abbreviations, you would be well advised to play safe and write in conventional language.

    In the English-Only forum we often talk about the way English is used flexibly and the supposed rules that are not always followed. There is often a comment along the lines of, "This is the way XXXXX is now used in most normal situations, but students of English should be aware that it may not be acceptable in exams or course work". In other words, they should play safe.
     

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