Please don't hold it against me.

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by BMap, Aug 14, 2008.

  1. BMap New Member

    English
    Hi! I need a bit of help...

    What is the correct way to translate the following phrases (with the correct colloquial meaning) into french?



    Please don't hold it against me.

    Please don't hold it against us.
     
  2. gillyfr Senior Member

    Montreal, Canada
    English - England
    Welcome BMap.

    In order to help you, we really need to know what the context is. Things are always said in different ways depending on what you're talking about. Also, we all try and have a go first, before asking people to weigh in on what we've said.
     
  3. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
  4. ascoltate

    ascoltate Senior Member

    Montréal, QC
    U.S.A. & Canada, English
    you could say "Ne m'en veuille pas" / "Ne nous en veuille pas" in some contexts...
     
  5. BMap New Member

    English


    I would think that this phrase wouldn't be that heavily context sensitive.

    Take, for example, a person introducing himself - and in the course of doing so, saying with a bit of wry humor, "I'm a lawyer. Please don't hold that against me."
     
  6. BMap New Member

    English

    There are a lot of ways I could Frankenstein this phrase together - but most of them would be inaccurate, flat out wrong, or sound like Jar Jar Binx translated into french.

    That's why I'm asking directly.
     
  7. BMap New Member

    English

    Which contexts would that be appropriate or inappropriate for?
     
  8. gillyfr Senior Member

    Montreal, Canada
    English - England
    In terms of context, you could say, ne m'en voulez pas (there's no subjunctive) or you could say, ne m'en tenez pas rigueur.
     
  9. BMap New Member

    English

    Do those bring across the same meaning as the english phrase? Or would it be perceived differently?

    From my absolutely abysmal knowledge of french, when I try to translate them literally, they seem to come out oddly.
     
  10. gillyfr Senior Member

    Montreal, Canada
    English - England
    Yes, they absolutely mean "don't hold it against me."
     
  11. BMap New Member

    English

    Excellent, thank you!


    And is using the word "please" as simple as adding "s'il vous plaît" to the beginning?


    S'il vous plaît, ne m'en voulez pas.
    S'il vous plaît, ne m'en tenez pas rigueur.


    Or is there a better/preferred way?
     
  12. ascoltate

    ascoltate Senior Member

    Montréal, QC
    U.S.A. & Canada, English
    I didn't use the subjunctive !! The correct imperative forms of "vouloir" are:
    Veuille / Veuillons / Veuillez

    I did actually start writing "M'en veux pas!" (which is certainly what is said in Montréal), but it's not technically correct, and I'm not sure if it would be said in France or only in Québec...

    Anyway, as to the meaning, it could be rephrased as "Don't blame me" or "Don't be mad at me" - so that might give you an idea...
     
  13. Donaldos

    Donaldos Senior Member

    French - France
    As a matter of fact, the forms veux/voulons/voulez are just as correct. These are used in negative sentences and specifically with the phrase en vouloir à quelqu'un :

    ne m'en veux pas

    ne lui en voulons pas

    ne m'en voulez pas
     
  14. ascoltate

    ascoltate Senior Member

    Montréal, QC
    U.S.A. & Canada, English
    Oh good - I was so careful about not getting involved in a "Quebeckers have bad French" argument that I erred on the side of hypercorrectness. Merci!

     
  15. DearPrudence

    DearPrudence Dépêche Mod

    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    I must confess that before coming to the forums, I had never heard "veuille" in my life (as an imperative I mean), though "veuillez" is common (and googling it, I only found books talking about it - is it correct or not - & the other forms are just the subjunctive)
    Apparently, even le Grévisse prefer "Ne m'en veux pas / Ne m'en voulez pas". Well, personally that is what I would have said...
     

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