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Please review attached the new leg on my wooden chair.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by skydown13, May 5, 2014.

  1. skydown13 Senior Member

    Mandarin
    Please review attached the new leg on my wooden chair.

    Does this sentence sound OK? If not, how can I rephrase it?
    In my opinion, 'attached' here is a noun.
     
  2. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    No, it doesn't sound Ok. What do you mean "attached"? A new leg attached to your old wooden chair? A photo of the new leg attached to an email? Something else?
     
  3. SwissPete

    SwissPete Senior Member

    94044 USA
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    Sorry Skydown, but your sentence is very unclear.

    How can you review a leg? :confused:
     
  4. skydown13 Senior Member

    Mandarin
    Sorry, It's for email. The photo of the new leg is attached to the email and I want others to review the photo of the new leg.

    Please review attached the photo of the new leg on my wooden chair.
    Does above sentence make sense now? Attached should be a noun in my sentence.
     
  5. waltern Senior Member

    English - USA
    "Attached" is not a noun - I would suggest something incorporating something like "the attached photo" or "the attachment" into your sentence.
     
  6. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Yes, just change the placement of "the":

    Please review attached the photo of the new leg on my wooden chair. :cross:
    Please review the attached photo of the new leg on my wooden chair. :tick:
     
  7. skydown13 Senior Member

    Mandarin
    Well, a lot of people (on google search result) use "Please find attached the quote for your requested equipment." What part of speech is attached here? not noun?
     
  8. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    There is a visual and understandable difference between these two (as you can see from our confusion with your original statement):

    Please find attached the quote for your requested equipment.
    (I can reasonably expect to find a Word document attached.)
    Please review attached the new leg on my wooden chair. (I can't imagine finding a new chair leg attached.)

    Now this would make sense:
    Please review attached photo of the new leg on my wooden chair.

    I'll leave parts of speech to someone else.
     
  9. skydown13 Senior Member

    Mandarin
    But I did change the sentence to "Please review attached the photo of the new leg on my wooden chair. "
    So the problem of "(I can't imagine finding a new chair leg attached.)" is solved.

    Can someone please explain why it is incorrect?

     
  10. Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    Please review the attached photo of the new leg on my chair. Normal English.

    Please review attached photo of new leg on my chair. Abbreviated English - articles omitted.

    Please review attached the photo ... Wrong. The definite article cannot be between the noun 'photo' and its modifier 'attached'. Compare with 'red the curtains', 'fat the man'.
     
  11. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    No. You are taking a particular shorthand term that's not good English and using it as your guide.

    As we continually advise learners, do not, repeat not, use Google as a guide to English. Google faithfully indexes complete nonsense, marginal English, slang and everything else as well as correct English.

    The word order is wrong as Copyright told you in post No. 6.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2014
  12. Edinburgher Senior Member

    Scotland
    German/English bilingual
    I find the notion of "reviewing" a photo quite odd, unless you're sending the photo to someone who was going to write a review (a learned or artistic criticism) about either the photo or whatever it depicts.

    If you're just sending a photo to a friend, and you want them to look at it, I would not use the word "review". One might say "see" or "look at" (or even the fashionable "check out"), but most likely I'd phrase it entirely differently, e.g. "The attached photo shows the new leg I made for my chair. Didn't I do a marvellous job? Now you can trust me to repair your chair too."
     
  13. skydown13 Senior Member

    Mandarin
    Well people use and discuss "please find attached the new word document" in this thread, http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=331546.
    So, I am really perplexed why "please review attached the new document" is incorrect. They have the exactly same structure.

    In my opinion, in "Please review attached the photo of the new leg on my wooden chair.", "the photo of the new leg on my wooden chair" is modifying the word, attached.
    Just like, "please write names, the ones you love." Perhaps I need a comma after attached.

    Of course I can just use Copycat's version, but I really need help on solving this......
     
  14. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    "Please find attached" is a rather outdated set phrase, really meaning nothing more than "I have attached..." It can't be used as a template for use with other verbs. It would be used in a rather formal business letter or email.

    As others have told you, "review" is not the appropriate verb to use here..
     
  15. Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    skydown, you're looking at the position of the words on the paper, not their meanings.

    In "Please review the attached picture." 'attached' describes 'picture'. It answers the question 'what sort of picture?'

    In "Please find attached the picture." 'attached' answers the question 'where will I find the picture?' It is a shortened form of "Please find, attached to this letter {or message}, the picture." I disagree slightly with velisarius on its being rather outdated. It is fairly common in e-mail, particularly when a service provider is addressing a client and politeness is seen to be important - so I agree that its use is 'rather formal'. For example, a financial adviser might well write "Please find attached my latest report on the progress of your investment and my recommendations for changes to your portfolio."
     
  16. Edinburgher Senior Member

    Scotland
    German/English bilingual
    No, they don't have the same structure.
    (2) is incorrect. The correct form is (3) "please review the attached new document".
    "Please find attached the document" is a more formal and polite way of saying "I have attached the document". It asks the reader to "find" (discover) that it is in fact attached.
    The phrase was already widely in use before email existed, it meant "I have attached the document to this letter, by using a paper clip or a staple". An alternative phrase was "Please find enclosed..." which means "The envelope in which you found this letter also contains the document."

    The structures of (1) and (3) may look the same to you, but that is because the real structure is hidden, and therefore you don't recognize it.
    The structure of (3) is nice and simple "Please review the document that is attached." -- The object of "review" is "document", and the adjective "attached" modifies the noun "document".
    The structure of (1) is "Please find that the document is attached." -- Here are two possible ways of analyzing this:
    (A) The object of "find" is not "document", but rather the fact that the document is attached.
    (B) The object of "find" is "document", but the participle "attached" acts as an adverb, modifying "find".
    No, that analysis does not work. I think I can see what parallelism you are trying to draw, but "please write names, the ones you love" is also incorrect. I think you mean either "please write the names of the ones you love" (meaning the names of the people that you love), or "please write down the names you love" (which might be said in the context of choosing a name for a new baby).

    If you really want "photo of my wooden leg" to modify "attached" (and here you would be treating "attached" as a noun phrase, a shortened form of "attached item"), you would indeed need a comma where you suggest, but you would also need to change your red "the" to "a" and add another "the" before "attached": "Please review the attached, a photo of my wooden leg". But this is not a natural thing to say. In this sense "attached" is clearly an adjective, modifying the elided noun "item", and you might as well make it obvious by having it modify "photo" directly: "Please review the attached photo of..."
     
  17. skydown13 Senior Member

    Mandarin
    Thank you for the elaboration!! One more question though. What is the part of speech of 'attached' in ""please find attached the new word document"??

     
  18. Edinburgher Senior Member

    Scotland
    German/English bilingual
    It's a participle, which is in principle a verb form. If you think of it as "Please find that I have attached the document", then it's a genuine participle. Otherwise it's acting as an adjective or adverb.
     

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