please See attached for your review and comments

Discussion in 'English Only' started by havle, Dec 2, 2008.

  1. havle Junior Member

    Earth
    Arabic
    Hi,

    When sending an email to office mate or boss, my friend use that phrase (in the title), I would like to learn another sentence, formal one, which give the same meaning.

    Thanks,
    Havle
     
  2. Franzi Senior Member

    Astoria, NY
    (San Francisco) English
    "Please see the attached for..." and "Attached please find..." are normal in business contexts. What type of formality are you interested in?
     
  3. raidthesound New Member

    CT, USA
    English - United States
    EDIT: Sorry. Yep, that way makes more sense.

    Please see the attached for your review and comments.

    ~Emily.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2008
  4. Franzi Senior Member

    Astoria, NY
    (San Francisco) English
    "please See attached for your review and comments" is a request for comments. The original document is attached, not the comments.
     
  5. Elwintee Senior Member

    London England
    England English
    I think this is mistaken, Raidthesound. The sender is asking for the recipient to review and comment on the attachments to the email. It does not make sense for the sender to send the recipient the latter's existing review and comments.
     
  6. havle Junior Member

    Earth
    Arabic
    for business emails I mean. I don't want to copy my colleague sentence, but I want to use something similar (formal and polite).

    usually the attached is a report or financial model.
     
  7. Franzi Senior Member

    Astoria, NY
    (San Francisco) English
    "Please see [the] attached for your review and comment" is more or less a set phrase. I think it would be fine to just copy your colleague's sentence. "The report/paper/[name of a specific report] is attached for your review and comment" would also be fine (in the body of an e-mail, not the subject).

    Things like this are also common:
    "Attached please find the quarterly report for your review."
     
  8. havle Junior Member

    Earth
    Arabic
    Thanks Franzi! That was helpful.

    what if I added the word "Kindly" instead of "please".?
     
  9. Franzi Senior Member

    Astoria, NY
    (San Francisco) English
    I think 'please' is better. Using 'kindly' in this context sounds sarcastic to me.
     

Share This Page