Plural of "bonus"

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Hutschi, May 25, 2007.

  1. Hutschi

    Hutschi Senior Member

    Dresden, Universum
    German, Germany
    Hi, what is the plural of "bonus"?

    Is it "bonus" with a long "u"?
    Or "bonuses"?

    Best regards
    Bernd
     
  2. dn88 Senior Member

    pl
    Hi, it's "bonuses".
     
  3. Jonny256 New Member

    English - U.S.A.
    Interestingly enough the word bonus in Latin actually means a good man, not a good thing. The word bonum actually does with the plural form being bonum; though bonus and bonuses is perfectly fine to mean a good thing and good things, respectively.
     
  4. orthoepicus New Member

    London UK
    English UK
    I've just joined so this appears to be an ancient thread but here's my contribution.

    "Bonus" should, of course, have had the "s" doubled to form the correct English plural so as to ensure maintenance of the short "u". Unfortunately, far too many words have been incorrectly formed, and usually through pure ignorance displayed in influential published material (major newspapers, novels etc).
    cf the plurals of words with a long "u" in the singular or in varying verb forms. eg "abuse", "muse", "fuse" etc. Their plurals etc with the single "s" create a pronunciation anomaly for the plurals of "bonus" and "bus" etc. An analogy is with "target" and "targeting". Clearly "targetting" should have been the correct spelling. (And that's before considering the English language problem of the hard "g" before an "e"!)
    As a Spanish speaker I despair at the number of word formation anomalies in English which probably more than doubles the amount of time it takes a child to read and spell English as compared to Spanish. Thank goodness English verb formation is far simpler. It's a pity that the great George Bernard Shaw had very limited success in his campaign to make English spelling less anomalous. Unfortunately, the problem is set to get even worse with the major dictionaries competing with each other to include the most new definitions in each new edition by trawling any old rubbish that gets published.
     

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