1. smokeymcpot1988 Senior Member

    England
    English (UK)
    J'essaye de traduire un article de la cuisine.

    Comment dit-on en anglais:
    Je privilégie une préparation avec peu de graisse (poêle antiadhésive, cuisson à la vapeur, à l'étuvée, etc)

    Je pense que ce serait:
    I favour food which is prepared with little oil (??:confused:??, steam cooked, grilled:confused: etc),

    c'est ok? or loin du parfait?

    merci pour votre aide.
     
  2. bobepine

    bobepine Senior Member

    Canada, English & French
    J'aurais tendance à dire in a non-stick pan.
     
  3. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    no-stick frying pan/skillet
    or
    teflon frying pan (nom d'une marque devenue synonyme de "no-stick")
     
  4. SwissPete

    SwissPete Senior Member

    94044 USA
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    non-stick pan

    EDIT: wildan1, je me demandais justement si teflon a subi le même sort que kleenex and xerox... :)
     
  5. Khandoma

    Khandoma Senior Member

    Paris
    French (France)
    Je dirais :

    I favour methods that use little amounts of fat : non-stick pan, steam, closed-lid etc.

    "fat" plutôt que "oil", à cause du beurre
    "étuvée" : cooking over low heat with little butter / oil and a closed lid that keeps the steam in. literally, "smothered"
     
  6. doinel

    doinel Modlife crisis

    Southern France
    France French
    John Gotti, a mobster was nicknamed Teflon Don, after a long series of acquittals. Nothing would stick...
     
  7. RennieViolet Senior Member

    Montréal, QC, Canada
    English - U.S.
    I like Khandoma's suggestion, except that I would leave out "amounts of", which seems awkward. And being American I say favor. =P

    Or you could say "I favor low-fat cooking methods:"
     
  8. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    à l'étuvée = braised
     
  9. Khandoma

    Khandoma Senior Member

    Paris
    French (France)
    RennieViolet : Could you say "low- or non-fat cooking methods" ?
    Because in steaming there is no fat at all.
    Wildan, I'm pretty sure "braised" is "braisé", which implies more fat.
     
  10. smokeymcpot1988 Senior Member

    England
    English (UK)
    thanks for all the help and the joke too.

    Doinel... c'est comme Antoine Doinel dans les 400 coups? cette film était super! je l'ai choisi pour mon mémoire!!
     
  11. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    Braised in English means it is cooked with a lid on and very little liquid in the pan.

    How "low-fat" the dish is all depends how much fat you choose to put in the pan.
     
  12. Khandoma

    Khandoma Senior Member

    Paris
    French (France)
    There you go then - how can you trust a country that uses the same word for different amounts of fat ? :D

    According to writer Patricia Wells, who keeps a rather decent cooking glossary, "braised" is indeed "braisé" :
    Braiser: to braise; to cook meat by browning in fat, then simmering in covered dish with small amount of liquid.
    étuvé: method of cooking very slowly in a tightly covered pan with almost no liquid.

    The difference is clear, and "braised", because of the fat, would not work for the OP's sentence.
     
  13. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    Patricia Wells is indeed a well-known author on French cooking.

    the problem with à l'étuvée is that it is a French term that is very little known by English-speakers other than those who are French foodies.

    So we live with saying "braised" for everything cooked with a lid on it, and add "but it has very little fat."
     
  14. FanduCanadien

    FanduCanadien Senior Member

    Victoriaville, Québec, Canada
    Français - Québec
    According to my French-English dictionary, étuvée (cuisson à l') means steaming. So, cuisson à l'étuvée et cuisson à la vapeur mean the same thing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2009
  15. Khandoma

    Khandoma Senior Member

    Paris
    French (France)
    :) Actually, they don't. Steaming is just a lazy way of translating "à l'étuvée" which, as you can tell, has no direct English translation.

    Cuisson à la vapeur : the steam comes from boiling water in a pot placed under the pot where your food is cooked. The upper pot has holes in the bottom to let the steam through.

    In étuvée, the steam comes from the one pot in which you cook the food.

    And braisée / braised implies fat. Whereas étuvée can use no fat at all but broth or water instead.
     
  16. FanduCanadien

    FanduCanadien Senior Member

    Victoriaville, Québec, Canada
    Français - Québec
    Thanks for the explanation Khandoma. Yes, as you say, it's a lazy way of translating.
     

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