podać śrubkę

Discussion in 'Polski (Polish)' started by butoholiczka, Oct 7, 2013.

  1. butoholiczka New Member

    polish
    Hi, I know, quite stupid problem but I was wondering how to say "podać śrubkę"
    i don't know which is correct "hand a screw" "pass a screw" ?

    thanks a lot!
     
  2. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    It depends on the context. How are you using the phrase? To give a screw and to offer a screw are other possibilities.
     
  3. butoholiczka New Member

    polish
    well, I mean I want to say that I was helping my friend with "giving/passin/handing" screw to his hand...
     
  4. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    Give a screw is the usual way to say it.
     
  5. butoholiczka New Member

    polish
    ok, thank you :)
     
  6. Szkot Senior Member

    Edinburgh
    UK English
    Ja bym raczej powiedział Give me a screw.
     
  7. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Could you please give sample contexts in which 'pass a screw' and 'hand a screw' would fit in?

    Would 'pass a screw' be fine in the situation described below?
    A mechanic repairing a car in the service pit, the screws are out of his reach, so he asks his apprentice to 'pass' him one.
    :idea: In Polish we could use either 'daj śrubkę' or 'podaj śrubkę'.
     
  8. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    I doubt if anyone has ever said pass a screw. English-speakers just don't use the word pass with screws. I don't know why. On the other hand, hand someone a screw is just as common as give someone a screw.
     
  9. Szkot Senior Member

    Edinburgh
    UK English
    Mojim zdaniem używają się pass i hand (oraz give) wymiennie w danym kontekście.
     
  10. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    I think you could well use the verb 'fetch'.
     
  11. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    Fetch in the U.S. has rustic connotations. That is, it is often associated with uneducated farmers and others who live in the countryside.
     
  12. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    This might very well be the case, but I like it all the same.
     
  13. Szkot Senior Member

    Edinburgh
    UK English
    Możesz, ale fetch ma inne znaczenie od pass/hand/give. Fetch to przynieść a nie podać. Oczywiście, że kiedyś musisz przynieść żeby podać, ale niekoniecznie.

    (W bryt. angielskim fetch to nie słowo tylko dla wieśniaków.)
     
  14. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    There you go, lad, the Americans have this sense of superiority you know ;)
     
  15. głupi Junior Member

    English - UK
    Moim zdaniem, "Pass me a screw" brzmi zupełnie normalnie i może się używa wymiennie z "Hand me a screw".

    Osobiście unikałbym używania "Give me a screw", bo (przynajmnej w Anglii) to zdanie ma inne znaczenie, które nie ma nic wspólnego z podawaniem śrubek...
     
  16. stypi New Member

    Polish
    In Canada people use word "bolt" instead of screw, probably same meaning, sometimes word screw you can use improperly.
     
  17. marco_2 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Traditionally a bolt (śruba dociskowa) is intended to be tightened or released by torquing a nut, whereas a screw (wkręt) - by torquing the head (and a screw has a sharp ending, as a rule).
     

Share This Page