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  1. Ridvan New Member

    Zimbabwe, English
    Is 'por fa' an acceptable informal abreviation of 'por favor'?
     
  2. belén

    belén Ex-Moderator

    Spain
    Spanish, Spain, Catalan, Mallorca
    Hi Ridvan,

    It is very colloquial, not something you will see in writing or hear in a formal conversation.

    Cheers,
    Belén
     
  3. rayb Senior Member

    Chile - Spanish
    Yes it is. However, I would say that it is written with only one word: "porfa".
     
  4. Alundra

    Alundra Senior Member

    Nueva York de la Mancha
    España - Castellano
    You can say "porfa", and "porfi" too. Both of them means "por favor".

    Alundra.
     
  5. charmedboi82 Senior Member

    USA, English
    Y a veces con 's': "porfas".
     
  6. belén

    belén Ex-Moderator

    Spain
    Spanish, Spain, Catalan, Mallorca

    I would not write it anywhere, I might say it at a given moment, but I don't think I will ever need to write it down. But who knows, maybe in a couple of years, the RAE accepts "porfa"...
     
  7. Ridvan New Member

    Zimbabwe, English
    Muchísimas gracias.
     
  8. María Gabriela

    María Gabriela Senior Member

    Los niños lo usan mucho, pero más comunmente "porfis"
     
  9. rayb Senior Member

    Chile - Spanish
    Si quieres no escribes "porfa", cada uno es libre. Pero muchos sí lo escriben, en particular en los mails. Por de pronto, para plantear la pregunta la forera escribií:"por fa";)
     
  10. Chaucer Senior Member

    US inglés/español
    Not to everyone. Ask yourself why you are looking for an alternative to the complete phrase. To save three keystrokes? to distinguish yourself? to evolve the language? to be cool? For you, seeing as that you're an English speaker, the instant of time it takes for you to consider whether to leave the last 3 letters off "por favor" you could have written them.

    Obviously, I prefer words written correctly. Criticize me. This not a cell phone or email where keystrokes, the rush of daily or work obligations, and LCD screen size are constraints. Some of you who write like that (sorry, foreros and those ready with a sermon) are plain lazy writers; considering that this forum is about language and that most of those here are some of the best at it, lazy writing is not very impressive and nothing to respect. :D
     
  11. sergio11 Senior Member

    Los Angeles and Buenos Aires
    Spanish (lunfardo)
    I have to agree with Chaucer. "Porfa" and "porfi" are very new developments that we did not use thirty years ago, or at least I don't remember them. To be more exact, I did not hear them until I joined this forum a few months ago, and then I just imagined what they meant utilizing my superpowers of deduction.

    Probably they got started either in a movie or television program or in some upper-class neighborhood teen milieu that everyone wanted to imitate, much the same way as the "valley speak" in 1980s' Los Angeles or other subcultures elsewhere, that are considered cool, or "fly", to use the word we learned from mjscott a few weeks ago.

    They are good to know in case you fall in a circle where the words are used, but I don't recommend you to get used to them. But again, this is the voice of someone who has been away from it all for thirty years... Maybe you should get used to it after all, who knows?
     
  12. charmedboi82 Senior Member

    USA, English
    I wouldn't call myself a lazer writer, just an accurate one. I like to write things exactly how I say them. By the way, cell phone? Isn't that the lazy way of writing cellular phone? Guess you're just writing like you talk, too.
     
  13. Chaucer Senior Member

    US inglés/español
    For some the laziness then starts before the act of writing then. But nice try with the abbreviation of "cellular", root word "cell"; "favor", root word "fa"? And if you are going to speak language, of which this is the forum, it is a very respected virtue to come prepared; I like's and I want's aren't enough.
     
  14. sergio11 Senior Member

    Los Angeles and Buenos Aires
    Spanish (lunfardo)
    Chaucer, you are asking for it! What are those apostrophes with your plurals? You are the person I least expected to do that !
     
  15. Chaucer Senior Member

    US inglés/español
    You use them to signify plurals as in "My i's and t's are not alway dotted and crossed." Without the apostrophes, "I likes" and "I wants" may momentarily mislead the reader into understanding them as subject-verb constructions. I may have used the incorrect form for avoiding that. I don't mind being enlightened about orthographic matters, though; what is the acceptable way.
     
  16. sergio11 Senior Member

    Los Angeles and Buenos Aires
    Spanish (lunfardo)
    I was too quick to criticize. I checked it out, and apparently, in the cases you mentioned it is the correct thing to do. I am sorry.:eek:
     
  17. Ridvan New Member

    Zimbabwe, English
    In my own defense (as someone who values the elegant and precise use of language) I am not generally prone to the abuse of contractions or colloquialisms. I do, however, have a great deal of interest in the evolution of the written and spoken forms of language, and was curious as to whether the aforementioned term (and apparently its many variations) was commonly accepted, it being something I have heard occasionally in casual parlance. I am sincerely grateful for all of your responses (and the rebuttal) ~Ridvan
     
  18. Chaucer Senior Member

    US inglés/español
    Ridvan, I'll apologize right off. I criticized, and as a recently arrived poster you can't have been prepared for it nor aware of what motivated it; how could you know of the issue I was discussing. I regret directing at you. And 99% of the time it is a pleasurably experience at this forum. So when you need to, come back to the forum with your future questions.

    Chaucer
     
  19. Alundra

    Alundra Senior Member

    Nueva York de la Mancha
    España - Castellano
    Chaucer, llevas más razón que un santo. Es cierto que intentamos reducir al máximo las palabras, y que no deberíamos hacerlo al menos en este foro.

    Además, te diré que en el móvil no solo escribimos "porfa", para ahorrar más todavía, escribimos "xfa", y algunas cosas más que te aseguro incluso para mí a veces es complicado descifrar, ejejejejje...
    Deberías verme a mí con el móvil, intentando poner todas las letras y mirando a ver si sigo teniendo espacio para poner todo lo que quiero decir sin abreviar, jejeej... a mi también me gusta escribir todas las letras, ante todo, para que no haya confusiones, aunque a veces me resulta inevitable (y lo hago sin intención).

    Pero también el decir "porfa" ó "porfi" tiene una connotación más de acercamiento, yo no se lo digo a todo el mundo, sino a las personas muy cercanas y en el sentido de "si haces lo que te pido, te como a besos", ejejej... incluso te diré que para dar más énfasis decimos: porfiiiiiiiiiiiii....

    No sé si conoces el juego de "Monkey island" (¿guybrush threepwood?? me parece que se llamaba el pirata...., que nombre más genial jejejej). Siempre recordamos en mi casa una parte del juego en la que él tiene que pedir algo, y se pasa un buen rato para "convencerlos" diciéndoles: "porfi, porfi, porfi"... hasta que al final lo consigue diciendo "porfi recubierto de nata", una expresión que ha quedado en mi casa como frase hecha para cuando queremos algo desesperadamente , y diciendo ésto lo conseguimos.

    Alundra.
     
  20. María Gabriela

    María Gabriela Senior Member

    Chaucer: Particularmente, no visito el foro para encontrar lingüistas, sino para ampliar mi vocabulario y saber el significado de muchas palabras (y expresiones) de uso cotidiano que no se encuentran en el diccionario. Los nativos nos informan mejor que nadie. Creo que "te fuiste por las ramas"
    Atte
    MG
     
  21. dexterciyo

    dexterciyo Senior Member

    Londres
    Español - Canarias
    Estoy totalmente de acuerdo con Alundra. Para mi escribir "por favor" no es lo mismo que escribir "porfa", "porfi" o derivados. De una manera es una expresión corta de decir "por favor" pero con un significado algo más íntimo y cariñoso a la vez. A mí con un "porfa" me convences más que con un "por favor", eso te lo aseguro, jeje. Además, decir un "porfa" o "porfi" a una persona conlleva hacer reír a la misma, por el hecho de que dicha expresión tiene su punto de gracia.

    Y finalmente también decir que estoy de acuerdo con María Gabriela. El idioma se va actualizando con el tiempo con nuevas palabras y expresiones que incluso en diccionarios no te puedas encontrar. Y eso es lo bonito, exponerlas, explicarlas y que aprendamos todos. El perfeccionismo y la monotonía de usar siempre las mismas palabras acaba aburriendo.

    Saludos ;)
     
  22. charmedboi82 Senior Member

    USA, English
    So it's okay then to cut adjectives down to their root words? That's simply absurd. I mean, is this a universe (for 'universal') concept? You can call it what you wish, but the 'correct' term is 'cellular phone'.

    Why does one do anything in life? The reason is ultimately because they like to or want to.

    I'm not saying that we shouldn't hold ourselves to some kind of higher standard, especially in the presence of language learners, but I do believe that changing our speech is absurd. If anything, it's better that they know how the words can come out sounding. I never condoned writing things like 'g2g' or even 'thugz' since they do have an actual spelling; however, taking away colloquial language and the like takes away from the person as well as the language experience.

    Take away a the largest words in the lexicon of a good book. It's the same as taking away this type of thing. You lose part of the essence of what the thing and the process is. That taking away is truly 'limiting'.
     
  23. niña

    niña Senior Member

    At home
    Spain - Spanish
    Por lo que estoy leyendo, me siento aludida y si en algo he podido molestar a alguien pido disculpas por utilizar por escrito una expresión tan presente en mi vida cotidiana :rolleyes: Intentaré ser aún más correcta (RAE en mano) de ahora en adelante para no perjudicar a nadie. Como muchos han dicho aquí, se trata de una abreviación de la palabra "por favor" y que por supuesto yo nunca utilizaría en un contexto formal, sino en un ambiente relajado e informal con amigos y familiares. Me siento tan agusto en este foro, que he dicho "porfa" muchísimas veces sin pensar que tuviera mayor trascendencia, pues a mi parecer, es una expresión de uso bastante común tanto en el lenguaje oral como en el escrito. Sí, he dicho el escrito también.
    A voz de pronto, se me ocurren un buen número de acortamientos léxicos que empezaron a utilizarse de forma generalizada en la lengua escrita con fines literarios, estilísticos o publicitarios, y que con el paso del tiempo se han despojado de su inicial carácter jergal desplazando o siendo preferidos a las formas plenas. Pongo como ejemplos: tele por televisión, moto por motocicleta, porno por pornográfico, cine por cinematógrafo, bici por bicicleta, metro por metropolitano, taxi por taxímetro, boli por bolígrafo, depre por depresión, cole por colegio, etc. (etcétera ;) )...por no hablar de los hipocorísticos.

    ¡Uf! ¿Quizás me estoy enrollando demasiado? ¡En fín! Creo queda de manifiesto que lo de "lazy writer" no iba conmigo :p
     

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