Portuguese-Spanish-English toast

Discussion in 'Português (Portuguese)' started by SimonGie, Oct 5, 2009.

  1. SimonGie New Member

    English - South Africa
    Hello all

    I am best man at my friends wedding and his bride has loads of family from Spain and Madeira coming over to South Africa for the wedding.

    I would love to do a short toast to the bridal couple in all 3 languages and would just like some suggestions.

    I thought along the lines of

    Health, love, and money, and time to enjoy them. - English
    Salud, amor, y pesetas, y tiempo para disfrutarlos. - Spanish
    ?? - Portuguese

    I would preferably like to have them all similar to each other.
    I'm not too worried about how to pronounce them, the pronouncing I can do fine, I just need a bit of help in what to say.

    Thanks all
     
  2. Joca

    Joca Senior Member

    Florianópolis, Brazil
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Saúde, amor e dinheiro, e tempo para desfrutá-los!
     
  3. SimonGie New Member

    English - South Africa
    Thank you!
     
  4. Dom Casmurro

    Dom Casmurro Senior Member

    Brazil Portuguese
    About your translation into Spanish, don't forget that pesetas no longer is Spain's national currency. It's Euro now. I think a better idea to translate 'money' in Spanish is 'plata' (Salud, amor y plata, y tiempo para disfrutarlos).
    Cheers.
     
  5. SimonGie New Member

    English - South Africa
    Hi

    Yes I know, but here grandparents are from Spain and are uite old, so I thought it would be a nice touch...let me know if its silly though, I'll change it to dinero.
     
  6. coolbrowne Senior Member

    Bethesda, MD - USA
    Português-BR/English-US bilingual
    I beg to differ. These sayings tend to survive the disappearance of their parts. No reason to change:
    It will be fine to say pesetas within that classis saying. In Brazil, after at least seven currency changes in the course of almost 80 years, some people still say
    Não vale dez réis de mel coado - It's not worth a rat's a$$
    Literally it says "It's not worth ten réis of strained honey" (whatever strained honey meant ;)), where "réis" is the plural of the old "Real", the Brazilian currency used in until 1942 (actually, from 1889 to 1942 it was "mil-réis", but that is not relevant to this example). Please note that this plural applies only to the defunct currency, not to the Brazilian currency of today, which shares that name.

    Regards (Salud y pesetas to you :))
    ---------------------------------------------------
    P.S.: Mind you, I am not saying that people in Brazil use that expression all the time. After all, it's quite old. However, if someone remembers to use it, they wouldn't dream of "updating" the "dez réis" bit.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2009
  7. Benvindo Senior Member

    Brazil, Portuguese
    Correto. E também ainda se fala assim: "não tenho um vintém no bolso", "estou sem um tostão furado".
     
  8. coolbrowne Senior Member

    Bethesda, MD - USA
    Português-BR/English-US bilingual
    Ótima, Benvindo. :thumbsup: Estas são bem mais atuais:
    Aquele "dez réis de mel coado" veio lá do fundo da algibeira, cheio de teia de aranha... :p
     
  9. Joca

    Joca Senior Member

    Florianópolis, Brazil
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Are you sure, Benvindo, that they go on saying those words? Maybe only people above 60, but then again you very seldom hear them say so. I am afraid these words rather belong to the literary realm, although they can be readily understood by the older generations.

    Now back to the topic, I'm of the opinion that, to keep it consistent, "money", "dinero" and "dinheiro" should be employed, without any reference to new or old currencies, that is, peseta, for instance. By the way, I think the word plata, as suggested by Dom Casmurro, is only employed in Latin America, but I could be wrong here.
     
  10. SimonGie New Member

    English - South Africa
    Ok, I didnt understand the previous 2 posts, but I'll stick to dinero and dinheiro then.

    Thanks
     
  11. Benvindo Senior Member

    Brazil, Portuguese

    Yes, I think they're still fairly popular. A quick search on Yahoo resulted in some 230000 instances of "tostão", out of which some 19000 were for "tostão furado".
     
  12. coolbrowne Senior Member

    Bethesda, MD - USA
    Português-BR/English-US bilingual
    Sorry, we skidded into a bit of hair splitting regarding specific Brazilian expressions, which illustrated the fact that saying containing references to defunct currencies can and do survive for decades.
    Therefore, this is suggestion may be well-meaning but it's ill-advidsed, since the Euro is still very young indeed
    The main point is that "Salud, amor, y pesetas, y tiempo para disfrutarlos" is a classic Spanish saying, which won't fade from use that quickly. They will surely appreciate the fact that a foreigner can quote it accurately. On the other hand, it occurred to me that they may well think it presumptuous for a foreigner to try to "update" it. Of course, the other two are pretty good renditions in the other languages, so "money" and "dinheiro" do the job quite nicely.

    Regards
     
  13. SimonGie New Member

    English - South Africa
    Ok so this is a well known Spanish toast/saying?
    Then I think I will stick with original and go for pesetas. I would like to keep it as authentic as possible.
     

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