preposition + time noun as a verb object

Discussion in 'English Only' started by HSS, Oct 5, 2013.

  1. HSS

    HSS Senior Member

    Sendai, Japan
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    You would say something like the following examples to tell your listener(s) for how long you can wait, using the construction 'I'll give you (or, you have) preposition + time noun to do something.'
    By extension would you say 'I got until ... / from ... to .../ between ... / up to ... to do something' to inform you are allowed the period of time before you have to get it done?

    Hiro
     
  2. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    Hello, Hiro.

    "Have" is the verb I usually hear in the US: I had until Friday to get it done. When speakers are allowing somebody a period of time in which to do something, they sometimes use "have" as you did in some of your examples: You have three days to make
    this happen.


    An active version with the past tense of "give" is also common: They gave me a week to finish the project.

    Your version with "I got..." seems logical, but I don't recall ever hearing anybody use it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2013
  3. HSS

    HSS Senior Member

    Sendai, Japan
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Good morning, Owlman. How are you? Fine I hope.

    Doesn't this sound natural?:)

    A: Professor Owlman gave us until Friday to turn in the homework.
    B: Phewww, for a moment I thought it was only until Wednesday.
    A: Nope! We got until Friday all right.
     
  4. Biffo Senior Member

    England
    English - England
    A: Professor Owlman gave us until Friday to turn in the homework.
    B: Phewww, for a moment I thought he only gave us until Wednesday. :tick:
    B: Phewww, for a moment I thought he said Wednesday. :tick:
    ...

    It doesn't work to use "to be" with "until".
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2013
  5. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    Good morning, Hiro. I'm well, thank you, and I hope the same for you.

    In your dialog, "got" sounds reasonably natural to me. In US English, I'd still expect "We have until Friday" or maybe "Nope! He gave us two extra days" or something similar. This is a big country, though, and it's entirely possible that there are regions where "got" in such statements is common. If I've heard anybody use it in the not-too-distant past, the use of "got" escaped my attention.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2013
  6. HSS

    HSS Senior Member

    Sendai, Japan
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Hi to you, Biffo. (Roger on 'I thought it was only until Wednesday' not working. Thanks for telling me that:))

    So you can say the construct goes with 'gave' and 'got.' But 'have' sounds more idiomatic.

    Would you say 'I'll give you from Tuesday through Friday to submit your assignment' or 'You have from Tuesday through Friday to submit your assignment'? Or, just 'I'll give you through Friday to submit your assignment' or 'You have through Friday to submit your assignment'?
     
  7. HSS

    HSS Senior Member

    Sendai, Japan
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Also, I now wonder if you could say 'I'll allow you until ... / from ... to (or, through).../ through .../ between ... / up to ....'

    Hiro
     
  8. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    You could say that, Hiro, but saying it implies that you and your listener are in an uneven power relationship. If you're "allowing" him a certain amount of time, you're definitely in charge.
     
  9. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    I might say "I was given until ... / from ... to ... / between ... / up to ... to do something", and yes, "was given" implies "got", but "got" is so commonly used for "have got" that I think it needs a little help if you mean it as simple past of "get" = "be given". For example, a time adverbial could help:

    Yesterday we got until ... / from ... to ... /... / ... to get our assignments done.
     
  10. HSS

    HSS Senior Member

    Sendai, Japan
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Hello, Owlman. Hello, Forero.

    Thanks for your posts. So we can use 'allow' and 'be given' with that construct. (I googled in their news section for 'allow you + preposition + time noun + to do.' It came back with one example. I think that goes to hint you at what Owlman told me.

    eg) Homework #2 has been posted below. Please be sure to turn in Homework #1. If you have not done so, I will allow you until Wednesdays to turn it in, but with a penalty for being late. Kyle Nearly)

    I'm still wondering if you would use 'through ...' and 'from ... through ...' in this structure.:confused:

    I'll give you through next Monday to come up with a proposition.
    I'll allow you from Monday through Friday next week to submit the assignment.
    ...

    Hiro
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2013
  11. RM1(SS)

    RM1(SS) Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English - US (Midwest)
    It works fine for me. "[F]or a moment I thought it was only until Wednesday [that he gave us]."
     
  12. HSS

    HSS Senior Member

    Sendai, Japan
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    I see, RM1. Do 'through' with 'I'll give you' and 'You have' sound idiomatic as in posts 6 and 10?
     
  13. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    It does to me.
     
  14. RM1(SS)

    RM1(SS) Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English - US (Midwest)
    Yes.
     
  15. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    I wouldn't say any of these, because BrE doesn't use "through" this way - but I suspect you are more interested in AmE, HSS.
     
  16. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    Of the possibilities you've offered, Hiro, "from Tuesday through Friday" sounds natural to me. "I'll give you through Friday to submit your assignment" sounds possible, but I'd expect to hear "till the end of Friday" instead.
     
  17. HSS

    HSS Senior Member

    Sendai, Japan
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Thanks, all, for your contributions. I have the gist of how you should use the construct. Thanks a lot!

    Hiro
     

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