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Present Progressive

Discussion in 'Português (Portuguese)' started by mtmjr, Nov 11, 2008.

  1. mtmjr

    mtmjr Senior Member

    California/Ohio (US)
    English (US)
    In European Portuguese, is it more common to use "andar a + infinitive" or "estar a + inf." to express the present progressive?

    (Eu) estou a trabalhar.
    (Eu) ando a trabalhar.

    ...my understanding is that in Brazilian, one uses "estar + present participle", right?
     
  2. MarcB Senior Member

    US English
    Eu estou trabalhando no Brasil e algumas partes de Portugal.
     
  3. Ricardoreis Senior Member

    London
    English (British)
    Absolutely right. :) Or Estar + gerúndio (estou trabalhando, estou correndo, estou comendo etc etc)
     
  4. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Those two are not quite synonyms. Not always, at any rate.
    Andar a + infinitive (and andar + gerund) are used more sparingly, and have a special connotation which, alas, is a bit hard to explain in abstract.
     
  5. mtmjr

    mtmjr Senior Member

    California/Ohio (US)
    English (US)
    Could you give me two Portuguese sentences in which the use of each construction is quite common and shows, in your mind, such a distinction? Perhaps I can figure out the nuance... (Probably not, but it's worth a try...)
     
  6. Denis555

    Denis555 Senior Member

    Cracóvia, Polônia
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Hi mtmjr!
    Well, we use "andar" when we want to express "lately" and "estar" to mean "now":
    Eu estou comendo uma banana. (Now, at this moment)
    Eu ando comendo muita banana ultimamente. (=I've been eating a lot of bananas lately)

    They can be used with adjectives as well.

    Ele está preocupado com a Maria. (=He's worried about Maria [now])
    Ele anda preocupado com a Maria. (=He's been worried about Maria [lately] )
     
  7. zelis Senior Member

    Estou a trabalhar - «At the moment (now) I'm working».

    Ando a trabalhar - «Nowadays, I've got a job» or «I have something to do and have been working on it these days».

    Sometimes, is hard to distinguish the meaning of «andar a» and «estar a», for instance like this exemple: «Que estás/andas a fazer?» (What are you doing?) In this exemple, however, «andas a fazer» indicates some kind of duration and «que estás a fazer» the instant.
     
  8. mtmjr

    mtmjr Senior Member

    California/Ohio (US)
    English (US)
    It seems to me that this getting into a Present Perfect phrase. If so, does this express the same idea?:

    Eu tenho comido muita banana ultimamente.
     
  9. Denis555

    Denis555 Senior Member

    Cracóvia, Polônia
    Brazilian Portuguese
    :thumbsup:

    Exactly!
     
  10. Alandria Senior Member

    Brasil - São Paulo
    Português
    Ainda há outra possibilidade:
    Venho comendo muita banana ultimamente. ;)
     
  11. mtmjr

    mtmjr Senior Member

    California/Ohio (US)
    English (US)
    So, in summary, can someone explain each of these and perhaps give an example of when it is used?:

    Estar + gerund
    Andar + gerund
    Estar a + infinitive
    Andar a + infinitive
    Ter + past participle

    Basically, there seem to be overlaps in tense between what I understand to be the "present progressive" versus "the present perfect". If there are any other constructions that I'm missing, feel free to add them... Also, are there any EP/BP preferences for one over the other? Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2008
  12. Ocarioca Junior Member

    Brazilian Portuguese
    1- Estar + gerund (Estou estudando muito para a prova = pode significar agora e tb ultimamente);
    2 - Andar + gerund (Ando estudando muito para a prova = signifca ultimamente; não se refere ao momento em que se fala);
    3 - Estar a + infinitive (Estou a estudar muito para a prova = mesmo sentido do primeiro exemplo, porém, não falado no Brasil);
    4 - Andar + infinitive (Ando a estudar muito para a prova = mesmo sentido do segundo exemplo, não falado no Brasil);
    5 - Ter + past participle (Tenho estudado muito para a prova = mesmo sentido do segundo exemplo.
     
  13. Ricardoreis Senior Member

    London
    English (British)
    Ok, this is my understanding of it...as far as I know, where the meaning is the same they can be used completely interchangeably.

    Estar + gerund (or 'a+inf)
    Ir + gerund (or 'a+inf)


    = I am doing (something right now)

    Andar + gerund (or 'a+inf)
    Vir + gerund (or 'a+inf)
    ter + past particple


    = I have been doing (something lately)

    I suspect the key difference is the difference between 'am' and 'have been'. Though for some reason, I always think when I see 'ir' and 'vir' used as auxiliaries that it indicates 'going' and 'coming' regarding time - that is i 'come doing something' (from past into the present, i.e. have been) vs 'I go doing something (from present into future, i.e. am).

    Though I'd love to know too if there is any sort of nuance at all in the difference between andar/vir/ter as auxliaries :)
     
  14. Denis555

    Denis555 Senior Member

    Cracóvia, Polônia
    Brazilian Portuguese
     
  15. mtmjr

    mtmjr Senior Member

    California/Ohio (US)
    English (US)
    Obrigado a todo o mundo!
     

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