privileged circle

Discussion in 'English Only' started by ewanek, Aug 25, 2009.

  1. ewanek Senior Member

    Czech Republic/Czech
    Hello, in the synopsis for "Brotherhood of Justice" I encountered expression "privileged circle". I would like to know whether it may refer to the family or the closest ones or maybe even privacy here. Thank you for your ideas.

    "Derek and Victor are two young men caught in a web of violence and destruction. It begins when dealers and vandals smash Derek's priviliged circle. In response Derek and his friends form a vigilante group, ..."
     
  2. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    Hello Ewanek. I would take it to mean his family and friends and the type of people he usually associates with.
     
  3. pickarooney

    pickarooney Senior Member

    Provence, France
    English (Ireland)
    It's not clear at all to me that the circle includes his family, or even his friends. It's more like a group of people who share knowledge. In fact, if it were his family, it would be difficult to imagine someone 'smashing' this circle.
     
  4. ewanek Senior Member

    Czech Republic/Czech
    Hello Ewie, I still haven't got over this "nut" despite of having read something about the background of this story (available on e.g. http://articles.latimes.com/1985-04-20/news/mn-21747_1_fort-worth). The text also mentions "privileged people" but I still don't get it. Thank you for your time and effort to explain it to me.
     
  5. ewie

    ewie Senior Member

    This septic isle!
    NW Englandish English
    Ah thanks, Ewanek. Having read a bit of that article, including
    I'd now take it to mean 'circle of friends' or 'his set' (as we used to say about 300 years ago in my youth).
     
  6. ewanek Senior Member

    Czech Republic/Czech
    What a tricky language! ;-) Thank you very much! Such a short phrase and I have spent hours trying to get the message
     

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