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  1. typicalst

    typicalst Junior Member

    Mexican
    How would you translate "profesionista"? There is not an actual context.
     
  2. fanecabrava82

    fanecabrava82 Senior Member

    Vigo_Spain
    spanish-Spain
    Hello
    are you sure that this is the right word??? for me it doesn't mean anything
    could it be "profesional" instead of profesionista???
     
  3. typicalst

    typicalst Junior Member

    Mexican
    Well... in Spanish it means "a person who exercises a profession". :confused:
     
  4. Moritzchen Senior Member

    Los Angeles, CA
    Spanish, USA
    You should be right fane, but I have heard "profesionista" quite a lot and don´t like it. It´s the same.
     
  5. typicalst

    typicalst Junior Member

    Mexican
    Well, they don't necessarily mean the same thing. "Profesional" (professional) doesn't mean the person has a job, while "profesionista" does.
     
  6. Kräuter_Fee

    Kräuter_Fee Senior Member

    Spain
    Portuguese&Spanish (native)/ (English&German - foreign)
    We don't use the word profesionista in Spain, but in Mexico it is a person who not only is a professional, but someone who got a degree. For example, a doctor would be a profesionista but a plumber wouldn't.

     
  7. typicalst

    typicalst Junior Member

    Mexican
    Yes, that's what I mean. Now... how could I translate that?
     
  8. Moritzchen Senior Member

    Los Angeles, CA
    Spanish, USA
    Well, look what momma says:

    profesionista.1. com. Méx. profesional (ǁ persona que ejerce su profesión).

    Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados
     
  9. fanecabrava82

    fanecabrava82 Senior Member

    Vigo_Spain
    spanish-Spain
    Well, in Spain that word doesn't mean anything, it doesn't exist. Probably in south America...
     
  10. typicalst

    typicalst Junior Member

    Mexican
    Yes... :D Now, how d'you translate that?
     
  11. fanecabrava82

    fanecabrava82 Senior Member

    Vigo_Spain
    spanish-Spain
    Just a "profesional"
     
  12. Kräuter_Fee

    Kräuter_Fee Senior Member

    Spain
    Portuguese&Spanish (native)/ (English&German - foreign)
    In fact I know that because I had to translate profesionistas once into English. I translated is as:
    People with higher education.
     
  13. fanecabrava82

    fanecabrava82 Senior Member

    Vigo_Spain
    spanish-Spain
    also "trabajador".....
     
  14. typicalst

    typicalst Junior Member

    Mexican
    :confused: ...:idea:... :D That might work! Thanks!
     
  15. fanecabrava82

    fanecabrava82 Senior Member

    Vigo_Spain
    spanish-Spain
    higher profesion??
    probably a "una persona con estudios" o "un licenciado/diplomado"
     
  16. i´m going to say "practicing specialist," as it seems to cover all bases:

    - has a degree
    - is employed in the field
    - is qualified and respected

    sound good?
     
  17. tatis Senior Member

    USA
    Spanish, México
    "Professional"
     
  18. Moritzchen Senior Member

    Los Angeles, CA
    Spanish, USA
    YES!!! Once and for all.
    It may not be used in Spain, but it is used for example in Mexico.
    And the original question asked for a translation.
     
  19. la zarzamora

    la zarzamora Senior Member

    buenos aires
    argentina-spanish
    Well, that in English is a "professional".
     
  20. la zarzamora

    la zarzamora Senior Member

    buenos aires
    argentina-spanish
    Not in Argentina.
     
  21. la zarzamora

    la zarzamora Senior Member

    buenos aires
    argentina-spanish
    so what about that plumber?
     
  22. la zarzamora

    la zarzamora Senior Member

    buenos aires
    argentina-spanish
    The word "profesionista" sounds just ridiculous. Like "fashionista".
    Maybe there is a connection here, a "proffesionista" (you wanted a translation, there you have it) is someone who dedicates himself to his profession.
    I have spoken.
     
  23. Moritzchen Senior Member

    Los Angeles, CA
    Spanish, USA
    La Academia Mexicana de las Letras, en su diccionario breve de mexicanismos, incluye esto:
    profesionista. com. Profesional, que ejerce una profesión.

    El español se habla en muchos lados y de diferentes maneras.
     
  24. la zarzamora

    la zarzamora Senior Member

    buenos aires
    argentina-spanish
    Eso es cierto.
    Yo sólo me refería a Argentina y a mí en particular, mi forma de percibir las palabras, cosa que - supongo está de más decirlo- no tiene valor ninguno. Bueno, lo tiene para mí.;)
     
  25. aynrander Senior Member

    Mexico, Sonora
    Mexican spanish
    Why would you do that? Why translate that?
    because of this:

    If the context is the use of such term in a... for instance in a Mexican juridical act, of the ones like judicial or notarial proceedings, maybe we have to take on a very different aspect: the necessity of such translation. who cares if it is referred to a person who exercises a profession. That is a long description of a category of personal data. What we need to know is the reason why is questioned that category of personal data in those proceedings:

    To let show the level of formal education of people. Education as in studies, not manners. As in the case of being a claimant or defendant in a Civil or criminal case, or as an appearing party in a notarial business.

    In the first cases above, it is an essential thing. In others like notarial business is just a matter of costum. A very, very. boring costum.

    I have seen so much about "profesionista", If it is contained at DRAE, what´s the problem? and if it is not used in Spain, what is the problem? this is a multinational forum: So here you have another view:

    We could just translate it simply and short as "professional" meaning that somebody did go to school and conclude it with a real universitary title or degree, and that doesn't implies to be a professional in others non academics areas, such as (you pick one) that is "university degree studies" with no further data. The simple word says everything.

    If somebody studied taxidermy at a university, that is a professional.
    if someone is a military, and has a degree, that is a professional.
    if someone didn't go to a university and finished it, that is not a professional.-

    I was looking for the same answer.
    Excuse my english and I hope nobody blows a whistle on me again.
    greetings!;) and in the first place why I am writing in english...i got carried away.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2011
  26. Mate

    Mate Senior Member

    Argentina
    Castellano - Argentina
    En la Argentina no se usa la palabra "profesionista" como ya se dijo arriba. Pero si vamos a creerle a este forero —y no veo motivo para no hacerlo— en México "profesional" y "profesionista no son lo mismo:
    Aquí decimos "profesional" en los dos casos.

    Consulte con un profesional matriculado antes de decidir qué hacer con la instalación eléctrica de su fábrica.

    Antonio no tuvo el privilegio de cursar estudios formales, pero es muy profesional en todo lo que emprende.


    En México nos llevan ventaja ya que tienen palabras específicas para dos cosas que no son exactamente lo mismo.
     
  27. aynrander Senior Member

    Mexico, Sonora
    Mexican spanish
    Bueno esa opinion es ver las cosas con sentido comun. Estamos hablando de formalidades, desgracidamente el sentido comun a veces no ajusta bien, y si, alguien puede ser profesional en mantenimiento electrico, aqui en MExico y en Argentina, puede ser profesional como Policia aqui y alla, pues hay escuelas para ello que otorgan reconocimiento oficial, y porque ambos ejercen conocimientos obtenidos escolarmente, tal vez yo tambien aplique sentido comun, pero me sostengo, Aqui cuando un electricista va a una notaria publica, nunca dice "Profesionista", cuando un ingeniero, se casa, compra casa o la vende o pone una demanda, dice "PRofesionista" nunca he visto que digan "profesional", a mi se me oiria muy pomposo.
    PEro fuera del contexto (formalidades legales) existen excelentes plomeros, electricistas y carpinteros que son muy profesionales, es mas ganan bastante mas que los "profesionistas" incluido yo. Saludos a Argentina-
     

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