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pronunciation - De nada (Mexican)

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by Marias-espanol, May 12, 2007.

  1. Marias-espanol

    Marias-espanol Senior Member

    Oklahoma
    USA-English
    Hola,
    I thought that the "d" sounds like the "th-soft d" in "nada". A friend of mine told me that it was the hard "d-like dog". Could someone tell me how is it said in Mexico please? Is the "d" in "nada" the same as the "d" in "de"? Look here http://www.studyspanish.com/pronunciation/letter_d.htm
    Muchas gracias.
    María
     
  2. Marias-espanol

    Marias-espanol Senior Member

    Oklahoma
    USA-English
    Hola,
    ¿Puede ayudarme alguien por favor?
    María
     
  3. Translink

    Translink Senior Member

    Corregidora, Qro.
    México / Español
    As a native speaker I can tell it is the same.
     
  4. fergy2005

    fergy2005 Senior Member

    Uruguay - español
    they have the same sound:like d of dog
     
  5. apuquipa Senior Member

    orilla del Río de la Plata
    spanish, south america
    For Spanish speakers it is hard to tell the difference between the "th" sound and the "d" (dog).
    But I believe it is the soft sound.
     
  6. Marias-espanol

    Marias-espanol Senior Member

    Oklahoma
    USA-English
    Hola amigos,
    Muchas gracias por la ayuda.
    María
     
  7. OcrT

    OcrT Senior Member

    Colombia
    Colombia (Español)
    Definitivamente siempre la D suena igual en cualquier palabra, get no complications with it.
     
  8. apuquipa Senior Member

    orilla del Río de la Plata
    spanish, south america
    En español sí. ¿Pero en inglés? ¿El sonido de la "d" es suave como en "the" o más seco como "dog"?
     
  9. dakotabrett Senior Member

    English (United States)
    Hi,

    D in Spanish has two pronunciations. The d in deletrear is pronounced similarly to the d in dog but with your tongue touching your teeth. The d in nada is pronounced similarly to the th sound in this, that, the.
     
  10. Grekh

    Grekh Senior Member

    Cognin, France
    Spanish, Mexico
    I pronounce them exactly the same way.....
     
  11. apuquipa Senior Member

    orilla del Río de la Plata
    spanish, south america
    Do you pronounce the "d" sound in "dog" the same as in "the"?
    I don´t think so.
    You probably mean, you pronounce the "d" in Spanish the same way in "nada", "deletrear" or "querida".
     
  12. Grekh

    Grekh Senior Member

    Cognin, France
    Spanish, Mexico
    Yes, I meant in Spanish.
     
  13. nzattitude Junior Member

    New York
    New Zealand English
    As a visitor to mexico my impression was that the locals said "de naatha" . the second "d" was definitely very soft to a NZ ear. The first "d" was softer than the way i say dog, but was stronger than the second " d"

    Actually alot of people said "por nada" with the same meaning.
     
  14. nzattitude Junior Member

    New York
    New Zealand English
    By the by, i have spent a lot of time in Chile, where the second d disappears almost entirely - de na'a.
     
  15. Grekh

    Grekh Senior Member

    Cognin, France
    Spanish, Mexico
    Yes, "por nada" and "de nada" mean exactly the same.
     
  16. dakotabrett Senior Member

    English (United States)
    Well, it depends on the sentence.

    If you say "¿Cómo se deletrea esa palabra?" the d in deletrea will be pronounced similarly to the th in that, because it is between two vowels.
     
  17. srta chicken Senior Member

    California
    US English
    Re: d vs th:

    Un comentario:
    A veces mis estudiantes--que hablan español en casa pero que aprendieron a leer y escribir en inglés--erróneamente escriben "the" cuando deben escribir "de."

    Una pregunta:
    ¿No se pronuncia una "d" después de una consonante (como la "d" en "anda") levemente más fuerte que una "d" entre vocales?
     
  18. apuquipa Senior Member

    orilla del Río de la Plata
    spanish, south america
    Puede ser, para los que estudian nuestro idioma como segunda lengua o para los especialistas. Pero para la gente en general, no hay diferencia.
     
  19. Blixa Senior Member

    Spanish, MX

    Sí, esoy de acuerdo. En Español, la pronunciación de la letra "d", no tiene diferencia en el uso común.
     
  20. JB

    JB Senior Member

    Santa Monica, CA, EEUU
    English (AE)
    I notice that all the posts that say there is no difference are from Native Speakers. The first problem is that native speakers in any language are generally unaware of the sounds they make, or how they make them, unless they are specifically into the subject of phonetics. I have had Americans argue with me when I point out that an American "o" is really a "ou" diphthong. People will insist that I am wrong, even get defensive about it, when it is easy to show that they do, in fact, pronounce it that way. Native speakers (Spanish, English, Japanese, anything) usually can't tell you where their tongue goes, or whether the larynx is vibrating or not etc., unless it is a specific are of interest for them.

    The second problem is that people do not speak in individual words, but in what are called "breath groups".which is why, when you listen to someone speaking Spanish too fast for you, you sometimes aren't sure where one word ended and another started. And this is also why Ketchup sounds like Catch up, and "could you" sounds like "cudju" (because of the way the d and y sounds get run together. I mention this because of Dako's comment about the "d" coming between vowels. In this case the two words are run together, so it is as if the "d" came between two vowels in a word.

    Everything said above is simplified, so I expect posts disagreeing with me. To conclude, if you listen to Spanish speakers (turn on TV, rent a movie, etc.) you will hear that a d in the middle of a word (generally, again, I'm simplifying, because this post is already getting way too long) is, as you initially said, like a "voiced d" as in whether, weather, neither, either, etc. And because it is this soft sound (the tip of the tongue gently vibrating against the upper front teeth) it is easy for this sound to virtually disappear as NZattitude pointed out. So that words like "hablado" and "callado" can sound like "hablao" and "callao".

    If you say "cada" with the ordinary American English (AE) "d", it will sound about the same as AE cotta (cottage cheese, terra cotta),. and to a Spanish speaker will sound like you said "cara" (face), and in fact this is a way of teaching an American to pronounce a Spanish "r".

    I haven't actually looked at the site you referenced, but if you check bookstores or libraries, you will find at least two tape/CD courses on the subject.

    Really truly finally. if you do a Sarch, you will find previous threads on the subject of Pronunciation.
     
  21. Marias-espanol

    Marias-espanol Senior Member

    Oklahoma
    USA-English
    Hola Grekh,
    You are from Mexico, so how do you pronounce them like the "d" in "dog", or like the "th" in "the"? In English they sound different.
    Gracias,
    María
     
  22. pejeman

    pejeman Senior Member

     
  23. Kibramoa

    Kibramoa Senior Member

    Deep South, U.S.A.
    Spanish - MX
    I agree with jbruceismay & pejeman. Unless you study the phonetics of the language(s), the average native speaker would not be able to tell the difference --no disrespect to anyone, it is just a fact.
    I was once one of those arguing until I was blue on the face that the "d" in nada, ciudad, deletrear and dedo all sounded the same until I took a phonetics class and analized the subject.
    :)
     
  24. martina from argentina Junior Member

    New Brighton, Minneapolis, MN, US
    argentina, espanol (castellano)
    I think that the hard "d" is more like a "t" for spanish speakers. keep on doing the "th" but use it as you pronounce "the" not like "Beth" (u kno what i'm sayin?)
    hope this helps!
    martu
     

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