1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Pronunciation: loci, foci

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Thomas1, Feb 16, 2007.

  1. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    How do you pronounce these words? Do you enunciate an or a [k] pronouncing /c/?
    I'd be also grateful for giving some examples of this sort (if there are any, of course). :)


    Thank you,
    Tom
     
  2. la reine victoria Senior Member



    Hi Tom,

    I personally would say - low-k-i, and folk-i. The can also be pronounced as low-keeh and folk-eeh.

    Not words which I use, or meet, very often.

    I'm sorry I can't give you any examples. You will find some if you search with google.

    LRV
     
  3. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Yes, a /k/ pronunciation for me to. We seem to respect the original Latin pronunication of these words.
     
  4. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Yes, I realize they aren't used frequently.

    You've just revealed a very interesting thing, you pronounce differently the /o/. I din't know that, thank you, LRV. :) I wonder if this also holds true for each variant of English.

    I tried but ended up with no results (I only got abbrevations).


    Tom

    EDIT: I've just found one croci.
     
  5. la reine victoria Senior Member

    Hi Tom,

    Yes, croci is the correct plural for the crocus plant; however, we call them "crocuses". :)

    I'm not sure about the pronunciation of the 'o' in variants of English.

    I'll try to find you some more examples.

    LRV
     
  6. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I don't think I have said either of these words in decades, not since geometry and optics were a major part of my life.
    I think I called them low-k-eye and folk-eye (that's the same "o" vowel sound for me).

    Out of interest, I looked them up and the OED lists only an /s/ pronunciation for the c in locus: making low-sigh. Unfortunately it doesn't list any pronunciation for foci, which is a pity because I really wanted to write foe-sigh :) I see that it suggests focuses (AE) or focusses (BE) as an alternative plural form.
     
  7. la reine victoria Senior Member

    Hi Panj.

    Dictionary.com gives /s/ and /c/ for both.

    LRV
     
  8. nikkieli Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgaria, Bulgarian
    Hi there,
    according to my dictionaries it is 'lowkai' and 'fowsai'.
     
  9. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    ??
    Interesting, if you let us know which dictionaries.

    I listened to US and UK voices HERE and they all pronounce c as /s/ for both words.
     
  10. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    I'm really interested to hear of this /s/ pronunciation. All I can say is that I've only ever heard both with /k/ - to the extent if I heard someone talk about "fowsi" or "lowsi" (before reading this thread) I don't think I'd understand what they were talking about.
     
  11. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Panj - I wrote the above before looking at your link. I don't think the fact they pronounce it as /s/ proves anything either way - those pronunciations are driven by rules - it's not someone who has recorded each word on a case by case basis. I don't know if they overwrite common "strange" pronunciations, but I'd be amazed of "loci" had been specially recorded and "c" before "i" is usually pronounced /s/.
     
  12. SFO Senior Member

    California/Buenos Aires
    English (USA/New Zealand)
    I've only heard (and spoken) them as "fowsi" or "lowsi", when studying both mathematics and physics. (In New Zealand and the US).
     
  13. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    WHAT! You'll be telling me next that the girl in the speaking clock isn't really sitting there just waiting for my call :eek:

    Seriously, that had simply never occurred to me - and now it has, I understand why some of the pronunciations sound quite disjointed. I just assumed it was like our own WR dictionary. Duh.
     
  14. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    :D

    I just checked it by entering cicicici, and there was an /s/ pronunciation each time.
     
  15. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
    We (mis)pronounced both of those as if they ended with the word ~sigh~ in geometry class (US mid-Atlantic).
     
  16. Tim~!

    Tim~! Senior Member

    Leicester, UK
    UK — English
    I would naturally use a 'k' pronunciation (and have only heard those pronuciations) on the basis that English-speakers pronounce the singular forms (locus and focus) with the 'k'.
     
  17. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    Daniel Jones's "English pronouncing dictionary" gives the ~sigh pronunciation first, and the ~key pronunciation second.
     

Share This Page