Pronunciation: loci, foci

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Thomas1, Feb 16, 2007.

  1. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    How do you pronounce these words? Do you enunciate an or a [k] pronouncing /c/?
    I'd be also grateful for giving some examples of this sort (if there are any, of course). :)


    Thank you,
    Tom
     


  2. Hi Tom,

    I personally would say - low-k-i, and folk-i. The can also be pronounced as low-keeh and folk-eeh.

    Not words which I use, or meet, very often.

    I'm sorry I can't give you any examples. You will find some if you search with google.

    LRV
     
  3. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Yes, a /k/ pronunciation for me to. We seem to respect the original Latin pronunication of these words.
     
  4. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Yes, I realize they aren't used frequently.

    You've just revealed a very interesting thing, you pronounce differently the /o/. I din't know that, thank you, LRV. :) I wonder if this also holds true for each variant of English.

    I tried but ended up with no results (I only got abbrevations).


    Tom

    EDIT: I've just found one croci.
     
  5. Hi Tom,

    Yes, croci is the correct plural for the crocus plant; however, we call them "crocuses". :)

    I'm not sure about the pronunciation of the 'o' in variants of English.

    I'll try to find you some more examples.

    LRV
     
  6. panjandrum

    panjandrum <<PongoMod>> EO'Moderator

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I don't think I have said either of these words in decades, not since geometry and optics were a major part of my life.
    I think I called them low-k-eye and folk-eye (that's the same "o" vowel sound for me).

    Out of interest, I looked them up and the OED lists only an /s/ pronunciation for the c in locus: making low-sigh. Unfortunately it doesn't list any pronunciation for foci, which is a pity because I really wanted to write foe-sigh :) I see that it suggests focuses (AE) or focusses (BE) as an alternative plural form.
     
  7. Hi Panj.

    Dictionary.com gives /s/ and /c/ for both.

    LRV
     
  8. nikkieli Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgaria, Bulgarian
    Hi there,
    according to my dictionaries it is 'lowkai' and 'fowsai'.
     
  9. panjandrum

    panjandrum <<PongoMod>> EO'Moderator

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    ??
    Interesting, if you let us know which dictionaries.

    I listened to US and UK voices HERE and they all pronounce c as /s/ for both words.
     
  10. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    I'm really interested to hear of this /s/ pronunciation. All I can say is that I've only ever heard both with /k/ - to the extent if I heard someone talk about "fowsi" or "lowsi" (before reading this thread) I don't think I'd understand what they were talking about.
     
  11. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    Panj - I wrote the above before looking at your link. I don't think the fact they pronounce it as /s/ proves anything either way - those pronunciations are driven by rules - it's not someone who has recorded each word on a case by case basis. I don't know if they overwrite common "strange" pronunciations, but I'd be amazed of "loci" had been specially recorded and "c" before "i" is usually pronounced /s/.
     
  12. SFO Senior Member

    California/Buenos Aires
    English (USA/New Zealand)
    I've only heard (and spoken) them as "fowsi" or "lowsi", when studying both mathematics and physics. (In New Zealand and the US).
     
  13. panjandrum

    panjandrum <<PongoMod>> EO'Moderator

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    WHAT! You'll be telling me next that the girl in the speaking clock isn't really sitting there just waiting for my call :eek:

    Seriously, that had simply never occurred to me - and now it has, I understand why some of the pronunciations sound quite disjointed. I just assumed it was like our own WR dictionary. Duh.
     
  14. timpeac

    timpeac Senior Member

    England
    English (England)
    :D

    I just checked it by entering cicicici, and there was an /s/ pronunciation each time.
     
  15. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
    We (mis)pronounced both of those as if they ended with the word ~sigh~ in geometry class (US mid-Atlantic).
     
  16. Tim~!

    Tim~! Senior Member

    Leicester, UK
    UK — English
    I would naturally use a 'k' pronunciation (and have only heard those pronuciations) on the basis that English-speakers pronounce the singular forms (locus and focus) with the 'k'.
     
  17. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    Daniel Jones's "English pronouncing dictionary" gives the ~sigh pronunciation first, and the ~key pronunciation second.
     

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