proud to be/proud of being

Discussion in 'English Only' started by reveur78, Nov 5, 2009.

  1. reveur78 Senior Member

    Philadelphia
    Italy, Italian
    Hi everybody.

    1) I'm very proud to be here (working in this hospital)
    2) I'm very proud of being here.

    Which one sounds better? Are there any differences?

    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. envie de voyager Senior Member

    Niagara Falls, Canada
    english-canadian
    Both are acceptable, but the first choice sounds much more natural to my ears. Even better:

    I'm very proud to be working here (in this hospital)
     
  3. reveur78 Senior Member

    Philadelphia
    Italy, Italian
    Thanks a lot!

    Are there any regional differences in usage (AE/BE) ?
     
  4. reveur78 Senior Member

    Philadelphia
    Italy, Italian
    what about

    1) I'm very proud of being a doctor

    Does it sound a little more natural?

    Or

    2) I'm very proud to be a doctor

    still sounds better?

    Thanks
     
  5. envie de voyager Senior Member

    Niagara Falls, Canada
    english-canadian
    I don't think that there are any parts of the English speaking world where "... proud of being here." is the normal way of talking. You can be proud of many things; for example:


    Proud of my country
    Proud of my children
    Proud of myself
    Proud of my skills

    But saying that you are proud of being somewhere sounds like it is on the edge of being broken English.

    Proud of being a doctor equates to being proud of your skills... it sounds fine. But strangely, it also sounds fine to say that you are proud to be a doctor. There might be a rule of thumb for this, but I can't think of it. Sorry.
     
  6. reveur78 Senior Member

    Philadelphia
    Italy, Italian
    It's starting to make a little more sense, even if it's still somewhat confusing.

    Thank you for your help!
     
  7. iconoclast Senior Member

    mexico
    english - anglo-irish
    To my mind, 'proud/ashamed/happy/etc. to' feels more "official announcement":

    We are proud to announce the birth of Anthony Edward George Smythington-Pryce-Jones.
    I'm ashamed to admit to what I've done.

    On the other hand, while 'proud/ashamed/etc. of + Noun' is normal, as has been pointed out, with gerund it tends, discourse-wise, to refer to past time:

    I'm proud of serving/having served on the town council (for four years).
    I'm not ashamed of doing/having done time, especially since I was innocent.

    At the same time, as is indicated in square brackets, infinitive is indeed also possible, but only perfect infinitive - I think. It seems a very close call, and may be one of those frustatingly wonderful instances where it all simply just only hangs on how you happen to come out with it at the time you say it.

    Thus:

    I'm proud to be a fighter pilot [= I am one].
    I'm proud to have been a fighter pilot [= I was one]
    I'm proud of being a fighter pilot [???= I was one].
    I'm proud of having been a fighter pilot [= I was one].
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2009
  8. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    Both these sentences sound natural to me:

    1) I'm very proud of being a doctor.
    2) I'm very proud to be a doctor.

    Unfortunately, I do not have a clear idea in my mind of what "proud of being" something or "proud to be" something means. But I understand being proud of doing something or of becoming something. For example:

    1') I am proud of becoming a doctor.
    [I am proud that I have become, or that I am becoming, a doctor.]
    2') I am proud to become a doctor.
    [I am proud that I am becoming, or that I am about to become, or ("subjunctive") that I might/should become, a doctor.]

    Notice the tense/mood-like distinction.
    I think something of this same distinction occurs in the original being/to be sentences too.

    The preposition of in sentences 1 and 1' plays a crucial role, telling us the relationship between proud and what follows: be(com)ing a doctor gives me pride, or I take pride in be(com)ing a doctor.

    We can "cleave" sentence 1' to change the emphasis, and the underlying meaning stays the same:

    1a) It is of becoming a doctor that I'm proud.
    1b) It is becoming a doctor that I'm proud of.
    1c) What I'm proud of is becoming a doctor.

    Similar rearrangements of 2' are problematic but suggestive:

    2a) It is to become a doctor that I'm proud. [To me this suggests that to might mean something like "in order to", but that is not the meaning I see in sentence 2'.]
    2b) It is become a doctor that I'm proud to. :cross: [Because of the nature of the to infinitive, this does not work.]
    2c) What I'm proud is to become a doctor.:cross: [This makes no sense to me, so I think the role of this infinitive is not as a noun phrase or adjective phrase. The infinitive is not the object of an "understood" of.]
    2d) Why I'm proud is to become a doctor. [This might fit the "in order to" idea.]
    2e) How/where/when I'm proud is to become a doctor.
    [The infinitive might be some kind of adverbial other than "of manner", "of place", or "of time", but what?]

    I think the ideas of futurity and emotion (what I called "subjunctive" above) come from the modal nature of "am proud to":

    2f) It is becoming a doctor that I am proud to do. :tick:
    2g) What I am proud to do is (to) become a doctor. :tick:

    Substitute "am able to" or "can" for "am proud to", and the meaning changes to reflect the difference between "proud" and "able", but the sentences are still grammatical.

     
  9. envie de voyager Senior Member

    Niagara Falls, Canada
    english-canadian
    I don't understand your point, Forero. Are you saying that someone can be proud of becoming a doctor, but they can't be proud of being a doctor? This seems to equate to the theory that someone can say "I am proud to arrive here", but they can't say "I am proud to be here." I must be missing your point, because this just doesn't make sense to me.
     
  10. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    To me, "I am proud to arrive here" sounds odd (something to do with the nature of the verb arrive), but both "I am proud to be here" and "I am proud of being here" sound fine.

    "I am proud of being working here" is not a proper sentence. "To be" is difficult to explain.

    I didn't mean you can't be proud of being a doctor. I only meant I am unclear. I probably need to study this a little harder, but I meant to be making two points in my previous post:

    • An infinitive cannot be the object of of, and I see this as suggestive of a difference in meaning between the infinitive and the gerund.

    • "To be proud to ..." suggests modality in some sense: for example futurity, emotionality, or hypotheticality (is that a word?).
    Sorry for the vagueness, but I see a slight and difficult to explain, but useful, difference in meaning between "proud to be ..." and "proud of being ...".
     
  11. sunyaer Senior Member

    Chinese
    What about this modified version?

    "Everyone dropped out on the journey, I am proud to arrive here."
     
  12. Andygc

    Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    sunyaer, what's your context? When are you saying it?
     
  13. sunyaer Senior Member

    Chinese
    I am saying it when I get to the destination. As the journey has been a difficult one in which everyone else has dropped out, I just feel proud of myself of reaching the end. Does that make the sentence natural?
     
  14. Andygc

    Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    Yes, you could say it to the television reporter at the finishing line at the moment you cross the line, but I think most people would prefer I am proud to have arrived.
     
  15. sunyaer Senior Member

    Chinese
    How would you feel with the word "here"? I am proud to have arrived here.
     
  16. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    The word here does not change anything for me, but it does make more sense to me with to have arrived instead of plain to arrive. It refers to pride in an accomplishment.

    It makes sense to say "I am proud to accept the award" because accepting the award follows the accomplishment in question, but "I am proud to arrive (here)" seems to be putting the pride before, or simultaneous with, the accomplishment.
     
  17. sunyaer Senior Member

    Chinese
    I have a little difficulty in getting the sense of "before" the accomplishment in the sentence, while "simultaneous with" accomplishment is easy to understand. Is it that "I am proud to arrive here" sounds odd as Forero points out in:


    Would you please explain a bit more on "to arrive (here)" bringing about the sense of "before" the accomplishment in the sentence "I am proud to arrive (here)"?
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2013
  18. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    The thing that you are really proud of is having finished the race which is signified by having arrived at the end. You're not necessarily proud of the arriving itself. It has been a very hard race, as you said earlier, so as you reach the finish line you are slowly limping along, one of your shoes has fallen off, your shirt is torn, you're muddy and sweaty and wheezing loudly. That is not what you are proud of. In general, you are proud of the entire accomplishment, not the last few steps.
     
  19. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    "I am proud to be a doctor" makes sense because my being a doctor is a state that has already begun. "I am proud to be a doctor" already implies "I am proud to have become a doctor."

    And "I am proud to accept this award" makes a different kind of sense because instead of meaning that acceptance of the award leads to pride, it means that I, proud to be qualified (= proud to have done whatever qualified me for the award), accept the award.

    But in the sentence about my arrival, I do not arrive with pride (as when I accept the award), and my pride does not come with my arrival (as with being a doctor). My pride comes after my arrival, in looking back at the race.

    In other words, in the context of the sentence about arriving (here), we are not talking about already being proud at the moment of arrival but about being proud once the arrival is past, when the accomplishment is complete. I am proud to have arrived.

    I hope this helps.
     
  20. sunyaer Senior Member

    Chinese
    In what contexts would sentence 2' mean "I am about to become, or ("subjunctive") that I might/should become, a doctor" , NOT "I am becoming"?
     
  21. boggiee Senior Member

    Turkey
    Turkish
    This topic has interested me, and I would like to ask one thing.


    - What I'm proud of is to become a doctor.

    Is the sentence still wrong?
     
  22. Florentia52 Modwoman in the attic

    Wisconsin
    English - United States
    What I'm proud of is to become a doctor. :cross:

    I would be proud to become a doctor. :tick:
     
  23. sunyaer Senior Member

    Chinese
    I understand it as " I am one" as "being" indicating "am". Is that correct?

     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2013
  24. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    There is no progressive/continuous gerund in English. We might say, for example, "keeping working", but not "being working".

    It is hard to explain because we can say "having been working" (perfect progressive gerund) and "being done" (auxiliary being with a participle).
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2013
  25. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    There is an interesting distinction relating to an earlier post.
    Both (1) and (2) are correct, natural English. There is a significant difference between them in meaning and usage.

    'I am proud of being a doctor' is a comment by the individual on his or her own feelings or scale of values. It is self-referential. The context is personal.

    'I am proud to be a doctor' is a statement referring to the individual's role in the community. It is more of a public assertion. It expresses the individual's judgement of his or her position in the eyes of others.
     
  26. Andygc

    Andygc Senior Member

    Devon
    British English
    You may see them that way, wandle, but I suspect that you may be in a bit of a minority. I would never have thought to make that interpretation. For me they mean the same.
     

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