provecho - probation

Discussion in 'Legal Terminology' started by COTORRA, Mar 24, 2009.

  1. COTORRA

    COTORRA Senior Member

    Southern United States
    American English
    I've been hearing "provecho" a lot recently to refer to "probation". Is this simply a mispronunciation of "probation" that has become common?
    Or is there some other meaning there?

    If anyone knows...
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2015
  2. Áristos

    Áristos Senior Member

    Cieza (Murcia, España)
    español (España)
    I have never heard that, at least it is not used in Spain.

    Do you mean that when some people talk about being on probation, they say "estar en provecho"?:confused:
     
  3. COTORRA

    COTORRA Senior Member

    Southern United States
    American English
    Yes - "estar en provecho". I was just wondering where the phrase came from.
     
  4. Áristos

    Áristos Senior Member

    Cieza (Murcia, España)
    español (España)
    I'm afraid I never heard that. But it looks like what you said, the mispronounciation of "probation".

    Let's wait for our South American partners to come and share their opinions.
     
  5. piraña utria

    piraña utria Senior Member

    Cartagena de Indias.
    Spanish - Colombian with Caribbean nuanc
    Hi.

    A broader context would be useful. As you has shown it, I mean pretty isolated, it makes no much sense to me as a Colombian lawyer.

    Regards,
     
  6. COTORRA

    COTORRA Senior Member

    Southern United States
    American English
    probation - libertad vigilada
     
  7. Aserolf

    Aserolf Senior Member

    Colorado, USA
    Spanish/Torreón☺MEX
    Probation es libertad condicional y no se debe confundir con 'provecho', no tienen nada en común. Saludos.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2015
  8. COTORRA

    COTORRA Senior Member

    Southern United States
    American English
    Parole/probation = libertad vigilad/condicional.

    Provecho is used by some to refer to this state. I assume it is merely a mispronunciation of the English, but was just checking other opinions. :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2015
  9. David Senior Member

    You are hearing Spanglish. It is endemic:

    Probéicho, libertad condicional
    Lálor, propietario de inmueble
    Troca, vehículo de carga
    Suamper, estibador de camión
    Mecha, fósforo, cerillo
    Clínica legal, asesoría jurídica
    Péiperes, expediente
     
  10. payita

    payita Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Spanish - Argentina
    Me sumo a este hilo para confirmar que he escuchado a mexicanos (no sabría decir de qué región) decir que alguien está "encerrado" porque "quebró el provecho". (!!!)
     
  11. elcarnicero88 Senior Member

    I can shed some light on this issue, living in the Southwest U.S. - Northern Mexico border region and being familiar with the phenomenon of "Spanglish":

    In fact, people are Hispanicizing the English word "probation". If the pronunciation of "probation" is formatted according to standard Spanish phonetics, it becomes "provéichon", which sounds very similar to "provecho". And Payita is right, many people blend the syntax of the two languages and translate "to break parole" or "to violate parole" as "quebrar provéichon" (probation).

    I wouldn't be surprised to learn that some people have taken this one step further and may be pronouncing this exactly like "provecho"; this happens a lot with Spanglish. Other examples of Hispanicized versions of English words are:
    "mofle" (muffler)
    "morojón" (motor home)
    "carapila" (caterpillar - tractor)
     
  12. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    And "traila," "yarda" and "rines" (rims) ...
     

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