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provo a spiegartelo

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Calgarygirl, Aug 24, 2006.

  1. Calgarygirl Junior Member

    English - Canada
    Can anyone tell me what this might mean. This was the answer given, when an individual was asked "how do you describe your feelings...?"

    Thank you as always!
     
  2. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Provo a spiegartelo = let me try to explain it.
     
  3. Bookmom

    Bookmom Senior Member

    Provo, I will try, a spiegar..., to explain, telo, invert te lo to translate - it to you.
     
  4. GavinW Senior Member

    Italy
    British English
    Or:
    "Ill try to explain it to you"
    "I'll try to explain to you"
    "I'll try to explain"

    I prefer the third and last translation in this context, on the grounds that the 2 pronouns (direct and indirect) are both probably implicitly understood.
     
  5. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    a) Why would it be "let me"
    b) Why has nobody said "I am trying to explain it to you."
     
  6. TrentinaNE Senior Member

    USA
    English (American)
    Alex,

    Secondo me,

    a) because that's how you might commonly express the same thing in English
    b) because that sounds a bit defensive in English.

    :)

    Elisabetta
     
  7. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    I said "let me try to explain it" because we often say " lasciami provare a spiegartelo". Gavin provided the literal translation that sounds very well too.
     
  8. GavinW Senior Member

    Italy
    British English
    b) Because the simple present can also be used in Italian/is frequently used in Italian in ways that are different from the "corresponding" tense in English, our own simple present. In Italian it can also have a future idea. Eg:

    1) I'm going to do sthg
    2) Im doing sthg
    3) I'll do sthg

    You might call this an "immediate future" The grammarians will tell you its real name. A few examples in Italian:

    a) Arrivo subito! (a waiter in a restaurant, who has seen you attracting his attention)
    b) L'anno prossimo vado in Grecia per le ferie.
    c) "Mi chiedi perchè non mi piace Martina? Te lo dico. E' una carogna unica. Ecco perchè."

    Hope this helps.
     
  9. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    Te lo dico. In this sense means... "I'm going to tell you." ?
     
  10. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Yes.
     
  11. GavinW Senior Member

    Italy
    British English
    And I'm confirming that too: yes! Actually, one would probably say "I'll tell you", in normal English, but the idea (future idea) is the same.
     

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