1. Sonicnurse80

    Sonicnurse80 Junior Member

    London
    Spanish-Spain
    cómo se dije en inglés la mujer que acaba de dar a luz? es decir, una puérpera.

    gracias!!!!!
     
  2. 3l1kl0X

    3l1kl0X Senior Member

    Spain
    Castellano - España
    She's a puerpera. My gf is at this moment, well she was for 20 days..
     
  3. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    Congrats 3l1kl0X!

    In normal conversation you would say "a new mother," "a woman who has recently given birth."
    Doctors would say "postpartum," ''a patient x days postpartum," etc.
    If they say "puerpera," it's only among themselves!

    The only time I have ever heard anything like "puerpera'' is ''puerperal fever'' (childbed fever).
     
  4. 3l1kl0X

    3l1kl0X Senior Member

    Spain
    Castellano - España
    thx Thanks, she's so beautiful (my gf girlfriend too hehe)

    I looked for it and that's what I found, puerpera. Altough I thought it was too technical I wrote it, in Spain we say 'cuarentena' as it usually last 40 days
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2010
  5. Sonicnurse80

    Sonicnurse80 Junior Member

    London
    Spanish-Spain
    "cuarentena" es el periodo, y "puérpera" a la mujer que acaba de dar a luz....

    anyway, muchísimas gracias por vuestras respuestas y congrats 3l1kl0X!!

    x
     
  6. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    What are you going to say?
    Really, I wouldn't say "puerpera" unless you have heard native speakers there saying it.
     
  7. 3l1kl0X

    3l1kl0X Senior Member

    Spain
    Castellano - España
    www.audioenglish.net/dictionary/puerpera.htm

    Oh, I didn't see this..
    Familiarity information: PUERPERA used as a noun is very rare.

    And yes, mea culpa, puérpera es la mujer y puerperio el periodo, el que se equipara con cuarentena.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2010
  8. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    All this emphasis on the number of days in the postpartum period! Does it have some kind of religious significance?
     
  9. lafemmejulieta

    lafemmejulieta Senior Member

    Argentina
    Spanish-Argentina
    cuarentena=quarantine

    It's not religious, is a six-week period after the birth of a baby (40 days more or less)
     
  10. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    Hmm, in English "quarantine" is only for contagious diseases and doesn't have to do with a 40-day period except etymologically.
    Is it another of those health-related things like ''ataques de hígado'' that only Spanish speakers get? :D
     
  11. lafemmejulieta

    lafemmejulieta Senior Member

    Argentina
    Spanish-Argentina
    I know, what I meant is that the word cuarentena does have a translation to English and it's not some sort of religious belief from Spanish speaking countries.
     
  12. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    OK, it has a cognate, but it doesn't mean the same thing. Or the meaning of "quarantine" is the same but "postpartum period" is not.
     
  13. 3l1kl0X

    3l1kl0X Senior Member

    Spain
    Castellano - España
    'cuarentena' can mean all you said, postpartum period, 40 days, for preventing diseases
     
  14. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    Right, but what I'm saying is that English speakers don't see the postpartum period as lasting a fixed number of days or otherwise being very clearly defined.
     
  15. lafemmejulieta

    lafemmejulieta Senior Member

    Argentina
    Spanish-Argentina
    What I've always heard in the States is six weeks.
     
  16. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    Yes, that's about right, or for some things "until the bleeding/discharge stops" or "until your doctor says you can."
    Having a baby is a biological event, the same as "ataques de hígado" and "dolor de cintura," but what's different is the way people refer to these things and their level of consciousness of them, which is more cultural.
     
  17. 3l1kl0X

    3l1kl0X Senior Member

    Spain
    Castellano - España
    We call it that way but we know that it doesn't have to last 40 days, as I said my gf's lasted 20 days..
    And it's people culture, I mean that word refers to that period since long time ago, not really medical stuff..
     
  18. nv1962

    nv1962 Senior Member

    California (USA)
    es, nl, en-us
    Although it's a bit dated, I thought I'd through in a reference to Wikipedia to illustrate the culturally determined duration of a puerperium, which varies quite a bit in its traditional length around the world. The opening paragraph of that second referenced text currently states:
    (My emphasis)

    Back on track: one way of translating the Spanish puérpera is: "mother in the postpartum phase" (I recommend "postpartum" and not "postnatal" as that term focuses mostly on the infant, not the mother).
     

Share This Page