Punjabi: apaRna

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by panjabigator, May 28, 2011.

  1. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Greetings:

    I understand the word "aparna" from the following Bulle Shay verse to mean "pahunchna", but I'd like to ask how to use it. Is it oft used/understood?

    Here is the verse:
    The transliteration is a bit shaky, so keep that in mind when you read my feeble and liberal translation: "No one can arrive at the state that Bulle Shah has achieved." It's unclear if "jaanaa" is "to go" or "to know," but it seems that either reading works well. Thoughts?

    Mamnoon,
    PG
     
  2. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Literal translation:

    Where Bullhe Shah had reached, no one else is going to get there

    Non-Literal

    The sublime heights achieved by Bullhe Shah will not be attained by anyone else.
     
  3. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Thanks for the re-translation. I was thinking along similar lines for the second one. Any thoughts on the word 'aparna'?

    Dhannvaad :)
    PG
     
  4. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    apaRnaa is exactly the same as pahuNchnaa. My maternal side of the family only use the former whilst we never use it!!
     
  5. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Thanks QP Sahib (do you mind being called QP Sahib?).

    Has anyone heard this word in Indian Punjabi? Koozagar Bhai, is this word common in Lahore?

    PG
     
  6. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    You are welcome, PG Sahib. No, not at all.

    Jitthey Bullhe Shah apRiyaa sii, utthe hor ko'ii na'iiN jaaNRaa


    I wonder if in place of " hor ko'ii na'iiN jaaNRaa", there should be "hor kise na'iiN jaaNRaa" (?).



     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2011
  7. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Are you questioning the quote (i.e., I've quoted incorrectly) or saying that it is grammatically incorrect?
     
  8. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    I am not sure really PG Sahib. Punjabi seems to have so many variations on the theme that it is not easy to say what is grammatically correct and what is not. Has Punjabi "crystalised" into a definable "Standard" variety? Even if it has, Bullhe Shah lived around 1680-1757 and his language is bound to be a little archaic. Moreover, I am no expert on Punjabi literature, old or new. For that matter, I am not an expert in anything..alas!:)

    Having said all this, I do detect an unwritten or understood "ne"

    Jitthey Bullhe Shah apRiyaa sii, utthe hor kise (ne) na'iiN jaaNRaa

    I have tried to find this shi'r in Bullhe Shah's kalaam but without success.
     
  9. Koozagar Senior Member

    Urdu
    I have heard 'Aapriya' being used in a different way. I am not certain of the meaning. But I have heard being said :" aapriya aapriya piya lagda aay"
    referring to a person. My hunch is it means 'Gaudy'. Will appreciate help on this.
     
  10. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Are you sure it was "apriya" and not "oprah"?
     
  11. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو

    I think you mean, "aaphriyaa aaphriyaa.." (Some what bloated) [aphraa hu'aa].
     
  12. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
     
  13. marrish Senior Member

    اُردو Urdu
    Surprisingly I remembered I had to add something to this thread and lo and behold! A post by me with no text above!

    I see an analogy with the following usage in a Ghalib shi3r:

    پوچھتے ہیں وُہ کہ غالب کون ہے
    کوئی بتلاؤ کہ ہم بتلائیں کیا
    puuchhte haiN vuh kih Ghaalib kaun hai
    ko'ii batlaa'o kih ham batlaa'eN kyaa

    We've got ko'ii + imperative here. I understand that the usage of jaaNRaa in the Bullhe Shah verse is in function of an imperative, a very common usage.
     
  14. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Here "batlaa'o" is not an imperative. It just happens that it is identical with an imperative but it is in the subjunctive mood.

    maiN batlaa'uuN/ham batlaa'eN

    tuu batlaa'e/tum batlaa'o

    vuh batlaa'e/vuh batlaa'eN

    Imperative would be:

    tuu batlaa/tum batlaa'o
     

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