Punjabi, Hindi/Urdu: جایا, ਜਾਇਅਾ, जाया

Discussion in 'Indo-Iranian Languages' started by panjabigator, May 14, 2011.

  1. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Greetings:

    This inquiry was sparked by my perusing of this thread. I've heard "jaayaa" used in a different sense in Punjabi by people of my grandparents generation. "Oh jaayaa su" in lieu of "oh giaa su," for example. At first I thought it might have been "jaa aaiaa," but I'm unsure now. I understand it is marked, and perhaps regional and archaic. I pose this information to you all with the following questions:

    1) Have you heard this before?
    2) Is this more common in certain regions?

    Any information on this construction that you may provide is, of course, much appreciated. I should also add that I am aware of "jaayaa's" usage in a habitual construction, i.e., "ھم لوگ اکثر لکھنؤ جایا کرتے تھے".

    With anticipation,
    PG
     
  2. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو


    1) No

    2) Don't know

    3) Is your hearing apparatus reliable? :)

    To me, it does not quite sound right. But, to me, "aj din baddiyaa laNguu gaa" from an Indian Punjabi popular song also does not seem right either!!
     
  3. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    Is one's ears EVER reliable? I can assure you, I've heard this.
     
  4. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi

    Not knowing much Punjabi I can only confirm your habitual construction in Urdu, i.e. "ھم لوگ اکثر لکھنؤ جایا کرتے تھے"

    This, as you well know, is quite standard.

     
  5. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Could the word "jaayaa" imply "male off-spring"?

    O [os daa] jaayaa suu.

    He is his/her son.

    ko'ii maaN daa jaayaa hai jeRaa meraa muqaabala kare?!

    Is there anyone born of a woman who can challenge me?!

    From Urdu..

    yih kah ke jo sarkaa Asadullah kaa jaayaa (Anis)

    Having said this, when God's lion's (Hazrat Ali's) son moved out of the way..

     
    Last edited: May 14, 2011
  6. Faylasoof Senior Member

    Plato's Republic
    English (UK) & Urdu (Luckhnow), Hindi
    Ah! I thought PG wanted just the verb! As a noun,جايا जाया jaayaais indeed used in Urdu to mean son / boy! Ultimately from Sanskrit, as Platts says:

    H جايا जाया jāyā [S. जात+कः], part. adj. & s.m. Born;—a son, boy:—jāyā-jagah, s.f. Birth-place, native land..


    Related terms are:
    جائی = daughter
    ماں جائی = sister
    etc.

    All of these are used in Urdu poetry and not just by Anis, bye the way, though he was renowned for employing a very large vocabulary, perhaps the largest amongst Urdu poets of his times at least, if not largest ever, particularly of the vernacular.
     
  7. Qureshpor Senior Member

    Punjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    PG Jii, the flow of information appears to be unidirectional!:)

    What have you made of the replies so far? As a far fetched guess, could " jaayaa suu" be equivalent to jaa aayaa suu (as you have already suggested) but "jaa aayaa" having the meaning of "ho aayaa"?
     
  8. panjabigator

    panjabigator Senior Member

    غریب الوطن
    Am. English
    I apologize for the absence. Have been at a wedding, so I'm sure you can imagine the ongoing craziness. I started to reply to this one, but the page reloaded and I lost my work. Le sigh!

    I think your replies are all great! I believe Bakshink (or perhaps someone else?) mentioned "jaayaa" in my thread on "jha'ii" ('mother' in Punjabi), so it certainly sounded familiar. My Dadi speaks a boli that's a mixture of different Punjabies but relies heavily on Ambala Punjabi. I have yet to pick it up (I just speak "Punjabi" with her) though I understand it very well.

    No guess is far-fetched! It makes a lot of sense, but my Dadi would use the feminine: "mai.n jaayii si." It very well could be "jaa aayii." I'll have to do some research in archaic forms of Punjabi to figure out if this form can be found in literature. Thank you again for the information!
     

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