que lo pases lindo

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by el faro, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. el faro New Member

    Can someone tell me what the phrase "que lo pases lindo" means?
     
  2. Oldy Nuts

    Oldy Nuts Senior Member

    Santiago, Chile
    Spanish - Chile
    First meaning to come to mind: have a nice time.
     
  3. Pinairun

    Pinairun Senior Member

    Have a good time!, enjoy yourself!...
     
  4. el faro New Member

    Thank you very much!!! I really appreciate it. Your language is wonderful I love it..... I put that in every translator that I can find and nothing comes up. A friend from Argentina say's that to me in emails and I like to use the translator instead of always asking "what does that mean?" You are fantastic.
    Thanks again.
    Bill
     
  5. Marqueesa Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain
    Maybe your translators didn't work because that expression is not usually employed in some countries, even when it is perfectly understood by everyone. In Spain for example we don't say that, we say instead:
    "que lo pases bien".
    (which maybe is more general than the first expression)

    Try it in the translator.. it works... (but they won't give you the most expressive and usual translation, which is "have a nice time", "have a good time", "enjoy yourself"..)

    I suddenly think that "have a nice time" would be the more literally translation of "que lo pases lindo" whereas "have a good time" is more exact for "que lo pases bien". But this has no importance at all.

    (Please feel free to correct me if you want)
     
  6. el faro New Member

    Hi Marqueesa,
    When I put "que lo pases lindo" in the translator, it comes back no definition found... When I put "que lo pases bien" in the translator, it comes back as "hope you are well". I believed that when she wrote that at the end of her messages, she meant "have a nice day" although, she usually writes "que tengas un buen dia" when she means that, so I don't know. sorry I wish I took spanish in school... At times she would write "espero que tengas un lindo dia".. Which I was thinking it meant I hope you have a nice day..
    Thanks
    Bill

    After reading your quote three or four times, now I know what you mean. I believe you are correct with what you said.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2009
  7. Marqueesa Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain
    el faro:

    forget the translator. That is useful sometimes, but most times it is not "correct", and it isn´t natural. That's my impression. Sorry if I confused you speaking about de translators.

    These expressions that you mention are very similar and they are used almost in the same way. At one moment you can say "¡que lo pases bien!" when you say goodbye, or in another moment you can say "¡que tengas un buen día!".

    More: you will use the expression "que lo pases bien/lindo", for example, to express that you want other person to enjoy in a party, travel, event...

    - Bueno, ya nos veremos el lunes, porque ahora me voy a la fiesta de mi hermano.
    - Bien, hasta luego. ¡Que lo pases bien!

    But you can use it in a general scenario.

    In any case:

    Que lo pases lindo = que lo pases bien == enjoy yourself/have a nice time
    Que tengas un buen día == have a nice day
    Espero que tengas un lindo día = que tengas un lindo día = que tengas un buen día = have a nice day

    The expression "hope you are well" I understand that means "espero que estés bien", and is used in other contexts in spanish. (Do not be very beliver with the translator...) :)
     
  8. el faro New Member


    Thank you so much for this information!! It is real clear now. I understand what you mean about do not rely on the translators. I can't thank you enough!!
    Que tengas un buen dia!!
     
  9. Marqueesa Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain
    rely: taht is!!! that is the word I was looking for when I tried to say... do not rely on the translators :) I forgot it. Oh my God my english is worse day after day... :(

    Thanks to you, and glad of helping you.
     

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