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Que Pasa and Que Paso

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by hardball, Mar 26, 2009.

  1. hardball Junior Member

    Maryland, USA
    english/usa
    Hola, I already tried to solve this problem on my own but I could not find the answer online or in my spanish dictionary.

    I listen to spanish radio as an aid to learning spanish. I frequently here the DJ use the terms que pasa and que paso.

    I know que pasa means " what's happening" but I am not sure what que paso means.

    Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. Sallyb36

    Sallyb36 Senior Member

    Liverpool UK
    British UK
    que pasó means what happened
     
  3. azuos Senior Member

    SPANISH
    It´s like - que paso del tema,

    Let´s go on to another thing, another subject.

    This is one of the meanings.
     
  4. Sallyb36

    Sallyb36 Senior Member

    Liverpool UK
    British UK
    Ah yes, I didn´t think of that azuos, gracias :)
     
  5. sanxuan Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish - Spain
    ¿Qué pasa? can be traslated as What's up! when used as a way to say hello.
     
  6. azuos Senior Member

    SPANISH
    yes sanxuan

    it´s like a slang way of saying hello, like que pasa tío. - what´s up man.
     
  7. hardball Junior Member

    Maryland, USA
    english/usa
    Thanks for your prompt responses.
     
  8. Dama_J Senior Member

    Canada
    English
    I have often heard "que paso" used in the same way as "que pasa", i.e. not really referring to the past, just a standard phrase meaning "Hey, how's it going?". In Nicaragua, for example, it was very common for my friends to see me on the street and say "Eeeh, que paso, loca?". They don't want to know what happened, they are just greeting me. In my mind I always hear it as "What's up?" or "What did I miss?".

    I'm not sure which other countries it is common in.
     
  9. hardball Junior Member

    Maryland, USA
    english/usa
    So would this be que pasa for amiga and que paso for amigo?
     
  10. ECDS Senior Member

    Badajoz, España
    Español
    In Canary Island, ¡Qué pasó! is an informal way to say 'How are you?', as Dama J says.

    Also, if someone tells you he has a problem or feels bad, beguins to cry,..., I would answer '¿Qué pasó?' (What happened to you?)*

    Edit: as i'm from C.I.
     
  11. hardball Junior Member

    Maryland, USA
    english/usa
    see above post and provide response please. Thank you.
     
  12. Dama_J Senior Member

    Canada
    English
    No, it does not have to do with masculine or feminine, it is just a regional variation of "que pasa" or "que tal". Que paso, tio? Que paso, muchacha? etc. It doesn't matter who they are speaking to.
     
  13. beandele Junior Member

    basque; spanish (spain)
    No, hardball, itsn't "que pasa" for girls and "que pasó" for boys. With no context, I think they both are ways for saying "what´s up?", the first one is more extended in spain, and the second one in middle and south america.

    ...I think.
     
  14. ECDS Senior Member

    Badajoz, España
    Español
    No, it doesn't matter if you talk to male or female person.
     
  15. ECDS Senior Member

    Badajoz, España
    Español
    Although, note the difference between 'que paso' or 'que pasa' and ¿Qué pasó? or ¿Qué pasa?

    Que paso/que pasa -> I am/he is not interested in this matter

    ¿Qué pasa?/¿Qué pasó? -> Hello, what's up, ...
     
  16. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    Accents are very important in Spanish, and that is true here. The phrase is not "¿Qué paso?," but "¿Qué pasó?" That is, it is just the preterit form of the verb pasar, not a masculine form of a noun or adjective. Also note that it is qué and not que. "Que paso" means "that I pass."

    Here in California, it is extremely common to hear "¿Qué pasó?" as a greeting, in which case it is exactly the same as "¿Qué pasa?" Of course, it can also be used to ask "What happened?" if something really did happen. For example, someone might ask this upon hearing a loud noise.

    ¿Qué te pasa calabaza?
    Nada nada limonada

    Edit: I was typing this while the previous post was appearing, but great minds and all that...
     
  17. hardball Junior Member

    Maryland, USA
    english/usa
    How can you distinquish by ear. IE., listening to the radio?
     
  18. gengo

    gengo Senior Member

    That's the whole point of using the accent. One is PAso and the other is paSO.
     
  19. beandele Junior Member

    basque; spanish (spain)
    Because of the acentuation: he / she doesn´t care (que pasa), puts the accent on the "pa" syllable, and what's up? is a question, and is pronunced like it, puting the accent on "Qué word", (and in "que pasó" normally the "o" is enlarged .

    ...I think.
     
  20. koxol Senior Member

    In "mexican", ¿qué pasó? is used as what did just happen?, what were you saying?, what's going on?.
     
  21. hardball Junior Member

    Maryland, USA
    english/usa
    I see, now I have to listen more closely. Thanks
     
  22. koxol Senior Member

    Well, the context in which paso (pass-o) and pasó (pa-so) are used is different.

    - Acá te paso los papeles. (hand you)
    - ¿Que crees que pasó? (happened)
    - Siempre me paso los semáforos. (pass)
    - A cada paso que doy. (step)
    - Se me pasó ir a pagar. (I forgot)
     

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