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Que significa tu nombre

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by sydbarrett, Jul 2, 2009.

  1. sydbarrett

    sydbarrett Junior Member

    chilean spanish
    What's your name mean?

    What your name means?


    ¿ Cuál de las dos, o ninguna esta bien?
     
  2. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    What does your name mean?
     
  3. lunaris Senior Member

    Tijuana, B.C. México
    Español, México
    yes. It is "What does your name mean?"
     
  4. Txiri

    Txiri Senior Member

    USA English
    "What's your name mean?" is fine. The 's can certainly be an apocopation of "does".
     
  5. zumac Senior Member

    Mexico City
    USA: English & Spanish
    I can't agree with you. I have never heard it said that way, only "What does your name mean?"

    Maybe Tarzan would have said it that way, like "Jane, what's your name mean?" (Just joking.)

    Saludos.
     
  6. Mariposa3939

    Mariposa3939 Senior Member

    USA
    english
    It could be said as "What's your name mean?", which is indeed an apocopation, or a contracted version, although "What does your name mean?" is certainly more common.
     
  7. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    I agree. It's very informal and borderline incorrect, but not uncommon.
     
  8. Dario de Kansas

    Dario de Kansas Senior Member

    Kansas, USA
    American English
    I agree. "What's your name mean?" for whatever reason comes across as a lot less formal (and perhaps less sincere) than "What does your name mean?" Both are acceptable, but I'd recommend the latter. :)
     
  9. zumac Senior Member

    Mexico City
    USA: English & Spanish
    Txiri,
    I owe you an apology.
    Your entry of "What's your name mean?" should be considered as correct.
    After I posted, I did some more thinking.

    First of all, I had never heard the term "apocopation", which turns out to mean to shorten or omit the last letter, syllable, or part of a word. The examples that I found are very similar to abbreviations.

    In the case of "what's", I consider this to be a contraction and not an apocopation. I had always considered that contractions were unique for the phrase being contracted. For example: I had thought that "what's" always meant "what is." It turns out that I was wrong in a few cases.

    "What's" most often means "what is."
    But, "what's" can also mean "what does", as you have shown.
    Therefore, "What's your name mean?" is "What does your name mean?"
    Also, "What's he want?" is "What does he want?"

    Like the saying goes: There is more than one way to skin a cat.

    Saludos.
     
  10. Chris K Senior Member

    Tacoma WA, US
    English / US
    "What's" can also be used for "what has": "what's he got left?"
     
  11. zumac Senior Member

    Mexico City
    USA: English & Spanish
    Good, Chris. Another exception to "what's" being "what is."

    Saludos.
     
  12. Txiri

    Txiri Senior Member

    USA English
    Exactly ... and the 's can also represent any other part of any other verb used as an auxiliary, where the 's represents everything missing from the verb

    Zumac: no apology needed! We're just talking about language here ... and it's meant to be for fun ...
     

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