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Queen of (the) Savannah. [Title]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by nimfae, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. nimfae Senior Member

    Lithuanian
    Hello,

    could anybody explain to me what is the difference in the use of the deffinite article in this situation: 'queen of the savannah' and 'the queen of savannah'? ? Are both sentences ok? Do they mean exactly the same, or is there any difference in the meaning/stress depending on where the definite article is placed? 'Queen of the Savannah" is the title of a nature documentary. But would it be wrong/make any changes in the meaning if we say "The Queen of Savannah'?

    Thanks to everyone for help.
     
  2. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    From Macmillan: savannah: a large flat area of land covered with grass in a warm part of the world.

    So Queen of the Savannah is the queen of a large, flat, grass-covered area. (The program is about a queen bee.)

    The Queen of Savannah would, in my experience and geography, be the queen of Savannah, Georgia, a city in the US.

    You need the article in the original. It's like The Adventures of Priscilla: Queen of the Desert -- a movie.
     
  3. nimfae Senior Member

    Lithuanian
    Thank you. So in fact omitting or not of 'the' means an absolute change in the meaning in this case.
     
  4. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Yes it does.
     
  5. nimfae Senior Member

    Lithuanian
    May I ask another question concerning the definite artice again? Because sometimes it's really confusing. Is there any difference between the two sentences?
    To improve the efficiency and transparency of business supervisory institutions.

    and
    To improve efficiency and transparency of business supervisory institutions.

    Is it 'efficiency and transparency' that is stressed in the first sentence, and the second sentence only states the fact? Am I right here?
     
  6. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    Well, those aren't really sentence, so let's try these:

    We are working to improve the efficiency and transparency of business supervisory institutions.
    We are working to improve efficiency and transparency in business supervisory institutions.
     
  7. nimfae Senior Member

    Lithuanian
    Is it possible to omit "the" in the first sentence? does it make no difference?
     
  8. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    I wouldn't, no. That's why, when I dropped "the" in the second sentence, I changed the preposition to "in." Please realize that I write more by ear than rule. :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2013
  9. nimfae Senior Member

    Lithuanian
    Thank you very much.
     

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