Rabbit - Slang (meanings)

Discussion in 'English Only' started by James Brandon, Dec 22, 2006.

  1. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    In British English, "to rabbit (on about something)" is "to talk", and it appears that it comes from rhyming slang ("rabbit & pork" = "talk", shortened to "rabbit").

    However, I seem to have heard or read "rabbit" used in a sexual or semi-sexual context, and I think it was American English. Apart from the obvious association (rabbits are reputed to be keen on it, hence "breeding like rabbits" and so on), I was wondering whether there would be a more specific meaning.

    If I am completely off-target, apologies.

    And a Merry Xmas too.
     
  2. jabogitlu Senior Member

    USA-English
    :warn:

    I've not heard much about "rabbit" in AE in a sexual context, except for the phrase "they fuck like rabbits," ie they're going on all the time.
     
  3. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    When I came across it, it appeared to possibly be referring to some sex toy used by women. I did not investigate. :D
     
  4. maxiogee Senior Member

    imithe
    In my day they were "f--king like bunnies"
     
  5. Thomsen Senior Member

    Washington, D.C.
    English USA
    "The Rabbit" is a vibrator. I think it is a particular brand (marca). But it could be used a euphemistic was of saying any vibrator.

    I have no idea why I know this...
     
  6. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    It is a sex toy - or so I am led to understand.
    It has vibrating forward-projecting ears that reach parts the other vibrators do not come near.
     
  7. clairanne Senior Member

    East Sussex
    english UK
    Hi

    The "Rampant Rabbit vibrator" was used on Sex and the City and since then has been "Anne Summers" shops best selling item, so it might well refer to that. They have several models!!!
     
  8. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    OK, so we have cracked it, so to speak. Some contributors are obviously very familiar with the sex-toy in question and its various forms. (Joking.:D ) It definitely has a sexual meaning, then, and refers to a sex-toy for women, i.e. a kind of vibrator. It may have been a trademark and now used as a common noun (cf "hoover" and many more). This was the context I heard it used in, in fact. As for Panj's mention of the rabbit's ears that reach the parts that other such toys do not reach, we shall leave it to the feverish imagination (and the expertise) of the Forum's contributors.
     
  9. winklepicker

    winklepicker Senior Member

    Kent
    English (UK)
    I shall be cautious about asking 'what are you rabbiting on about?' in future.
     
  10. beppo Senior Member

    Venice
    Italian
    To have some rabbit=to be sexually active. That's what I found in an english slang thesaurus. Anyone heard of this?
     
  11. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    Yes, to say of, say, a colleague: "She never stops rabitting on" - could land you in an industrial tribunal for sexual harassment, from now on. :p

    As for the expression "to have some rabbit", I cannot say I am familiar with it, but some people may use it.

    It makes me think of the expression: "to have a bit of pork", but that is different. My understanding is that it is sometimes used (in the vulgar register, obviously) by Black men referring to the opportunity of having some sex with a White woman.

    Animals are a great source of inspiration in that department...
     
  12. jabogitlu Senior Member

    USA-English
    That's funny, for me "to pork" is synonymous with merely having sex.
     
  13. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    I have never heard "to pork" in order to mean "to have sex" - a more vulgar expression, one could not imagine, it must be said. Maybe it is used in the UK but I am not familiar with it.

    As for "to have a bit of pork", I have heard it used by White Englishmen who claimed it was used by Blacks in the UK and/or the US. I assume it to be true. "Pork" would be a reference to the whitish skin colour. I believe it is well known that many non-Whites find the skin colour of Whites a little bit off-putting because sickly (white = lack of colour). I hasten to add I have no opinion of my own in such matters!... "Pork" could be an acquired taste anyway. :D
     
  14. B.B.James Junior Member

    Dorset, England
    English-UK
    Hi

    The verb 'to pork' is definitely used in American English slang (see the film 'Throw Your Momma Off The Train') to mean copulation.

    'To rabbit' does not imply anything sexual when used a verb, it merely means to chatter profusely (in some customer service training exercises, you learn how to deal with 'Mrs Rabbit' the type of customer who likes to talk a lot to you and not let you get a word in edgeways!).

    To incorporate rabbits into a sexual innuendo you need one of the qualifying vulgar verbs (shag, f***, or you could simply say 'at it like rabbits'). The Rampant Rabbits are vibrators, and also the name of one of the 5-a-side football teams in our office league. As the league secretary, I'm the one at fault for letting them get away with it!

    I don't think an attempted sexual harassment case would stand up as such in court for accusing someone of 'rabbiting on'. If it did, I would resign from the world on the basis of it being completely insane.

    BB
     
  15. clairanne Senior Member

    East Sussex
    english UK
    hi

    I think all this "rabbiting" on about sex has rather got off the point, don't you. We do however say "porking" in UK but it is very vulgar and I told my son off in no uncertain terms for using it in the house.
     
  16. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    The terminology or the vibrator?


    In AE, the only uses I know for rabbit, other than F___ like a bunnie, are for long distance runners and someone driving very fast in front of you. Such a driver is always welcomed by other drivers exceeding the legal speed limit, as the rabbit will be the first to attract the "pig" or traffic cop, thus allowing the other speeders to continue on their merry way while the rabbit is ticketed.
     
  17. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    It is funny how word associations work - from 'rabbit' to 'pork' and from 'pork' to 'pig'!... It has been made abundantly clear that there is no direct sexual meaning attached to the word 'rabbit' on its own, but for this make of vibrators - hence my original query. As a result, the make of vibrators appears to be lending a clear and direct sexual meaning to 'rabbit' (as a sex toy).

    PS - As for the mention of the industrial tribunal, I must stress that this was done in jest (whether it was funny or not).
     
  18. C1PNR

    C1PNR New Member

    SW Idaho
    English
    "To Rabbit" is to run like hell! Kind of like "Tennis Shoe" in that: "He rabbitted on the check at the Truck Stop," or "She tennis shoed rather than paying" meaning he and she ran out the (usually back) door without paying.

    Or asking someone: "You're not going to rabbit on me, are you?" And that usage could have to do with any kind of "abandonment" context.

    I can remember being "Rabbitted" or "Tennis Shoed" more than once (I'm a slow learner;) ) by my new found friend from the bar, usually after a 2 AM breakfast of Steak & Eggs!

    BTW, since I got married, this just doesn't happen any more!:D
     
  19. Macunaíma

    Macunaíma Senior Member

    Um ninho de mafagalfinhos
    português, Brasil
    You can find the "verb" bunny f**** in the book Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger. I guess the meaning is pretty obvious: to have a quickie.
     
  20. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    An item in the news today has reminded me of this Thread: the Rampant Rabbit has been front-page news. An young Englishman tried to rob a shop (I believe it was a shop), brandishing what looked like a gun but was in fact his ex-girlfriend's Rampant Rabbit wrapped up in a plastic bag that made the thing look like a weapon destined to inflict destruction (as opposed to pleasure).

    He ran off with about £600 (under $1,200), has been caught, and has been sentenced to 5 years in prison. The judge took the view that, if it looks like a gun, it is as good as one. So, Rampant Rabbit it is.

    You can hardly imagine a more dismal story, I should say.
     
  21. SuburbanGal New Member

    English
    Allegedly, the phrase "White Bunnie", is an Urban term of which some people of color make reference to caucasian women who are dating or partnered with a black man and who have fathered their children. The source is an urban black woman. The example provided: "Oh look at that white bunnie over there".
     
  22. Spira Senior Member

    South of France
    UK English
    In my humdrum little life, with absolutely no presence of rabbits, rampant or otherwise, American runners talk about "the rabbit", meaning the guy whose specific job is to set the pace in a race. The Brits call the same person "the hare" (a term borrowed from greyhound racing).
     
  23. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    The expression "white bunnie" is not heard in the UK, to the best of my knowledge. What I have heard in terms of zoological metaphors relating to inter-racial sexual relationships is "a bit of pork", seemingly to refer to "having sex with a white woman", and said by a black male. ("He likes to have a bit of pork, from time to time...") "Pork", here, presumably, is a reference to the colour of the skin. If you think about it, black skin is not black, but dark brown, and white skin is not white, but vaguely pink.

    In the context that I came across "rabbit" initially, it implied a sexual meaning (hence "rampant rabbit"); it did not relate to outdoor sports pursuits such as running/jogging (although, come to think of it, there is no knowing where those "rampant rabbits" might be used...).

    ---youtube link removed

    And further explanations on Wicked-Pedia:-

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbit_vibrator

    "Rabbit vibrator (also known as a Jack Rabbit vibrator or Jessica Rabbit vibrator) is a vibrating and rotating sex toy made in the shape of a phallus with a clitoral stimulator attached to the shaft. The name of the device is derived from the fact that the clitoral stimulator looks like a pair of rabbit ears."
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2010
  24. ErnieBurton New Member

    English -American
    I just had someone on an online dating site say to me "i think you are a rabbit! cool :) me too." That's what inspired me to look here. "To be sexually active" is the way I took this but I suppose it could mean to be talkative.

    Any thoughts?

    **Ok I just asked. She was referring to Chinese astrology! Ha!
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2010
  25. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    Welcome, ErnieBurton. :)

    If we had a sentence or two from the conversation this, or some idea of what you had been talking about, that might give us an idea of what she had in mind.

    However, I really think you should ask her what she meant. There are too many possible interpretations, and we wouldn't want to mislead you.
     
  26. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    Thank you for getting back to us with this. :thumbsup:

    This possible meaning of rabbit may be helpful to someone else who consults the thread later. :)
     
  27. James Brandon

    James Brandon Senior Member

    Greater London (UK)
    English + French - UK
    Rabbit used when referring to a sex toy should not be confused with rabbit in Chinese astrology (the year of the rabbit, etc.), and then again there can be other connotations.

    As one can see from your example, Ernie, confusion could easily cloud the intended meaning and lead to most unfortunate misunderstandings - a reference to astrology being mistaken for a pass (of a sexual nature). :p
     

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