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Realistic purpose

Discussion in 'English Only' started by diaxlna, May 25, 2008.

  1. diaxlna

    diaxlna Senior Member

    London, UK
    Galician & Spanish - Spain
    Hi, I've been trying to understand the meaning of "realistic purpose" in this sentence but I can't get the meaning. I've looked for realistic and for purpose separatedly but it doesn't make sense.

    I'll give you the sentence:

    "The Crown prosecutor considers whether there's sufficient evidence to provide a realistic purpose of conviction."

    could enyone explain it please? I've tried to give you my options but none make sense (even for me)...

    THANKS! and please, correct any mistake you find!!!
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2008
  2. gasman Senior Member

    Canada, English
    I would suggest that the phrase means "an end result".
     
  3. Gordonedi

    Gordonedi Senior Member

    Strathaven
    UK (Scotland) English
    The phrase "realistic purpose of conviction" is interesting.

    I would expect prosecution service to consider whether there is a purpose in seeking prosecution, because conviction might not be possible on the evidence available.

    It seems more unusual for the prosecution service to consider whether a conviction might serve a realistic purpose - in other words, whether there is any point convicting the criminal because the sentence or fine might not act as a deterrent to him or others.
     
  4. mtmjr

    mtmjr Senior Member

    California/Ohio (US)
    English (US)
    Well, without more context, it is difficult to determine the meaning. As such, I would go with Gordonedi's second interpretation.

    You also wanted to be corrected for any mistakes:

    separatedly = separately
    enyone = anyone

    "I've tried to give you my options but none make sense (even for me)..." This sentence does not make sense since you state that you have given us your options, yet I fail to see that you have. Instead, I believe you meant:

    "I would have given you my options, but none make sense (even for me)..."
     
  5. Dimcl Senior Member

    British Columbia, Canada
    Canadian English
    Is this a translation, by any chance? "realistic purpose" is very odd-sounding and I suspect that it's, at least, a typo. It means "realistic possibility" or "realistic chance".
     
  6. Unknoewn13 Senior Member

    New Jersey
    English - American
    I've actually used "realistic purpose" before...it simply clarifies that the prosecutor isn't giving just a reason for conviction, which might be a truly bad reason for conviction, but rather it must be a reason (purpose) that makes sense. For example, accidentally dropping a glass is an unrealistic purpose for going to jail; a more realistic purpose would be murder.
     
  7. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    I'm certain there's a typo/misprint in the original sentence.

    It should read "The Crown Prosecutor considers whether there's sufficient evidence to provide a realistic prospect of conviction."

    As in, for example, this Crown Prosecution Service press release:
     
  8. DamaYasmin

    DamaYasmin Junior Member

    Colonia Austin Gardens
    Mexico Spanish
    I agree with Loob. Since realistic is a positive term as well as purpose. If it were an unrealistic purpose - I'd have second thoughts :)
     
  9. diaxlna

    diaxlna Senior Member

    London, UK
    Galician & Spanish - Spain
    I've just talked to one of my classmates and she told me that I had copied wrong the sentence.. It's not realistic purpose but realistic prospect..

    Now I know why I didn't understand the meaning...

    Thanks and sorry!!!
     
  10. Dimcl Senior Member

    British Columbia, Canada
    Canadian English
    Perhaps you should stop using it, Unknoewn...:)
     
  11. ggerard Junior Member

    Spain-Catalunya, català/castellà
    While looking for separatedly in the web, I've found this post. To state that although in Wordreference separatedly does not appear, this word is actually described in other dictionaries

    http://www.websters-dictionary-online.com/definitions/separatedly

    However, it really seems that for most of the people is incorrect, and no other dictionaries have this word defined?


     

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