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rear, raise or bring up?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by panjandrum, Sep 21, 2005.

  1. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    In British English, there is a tendency to use rear for animals and bring up for children.
    Animals may also be raised.
    Children may also be raised or reared.
    Families are raised.

    Comments welcome from other BE-speakers as I am certain there are regional variations.
    Comments especially welcome from AE-speakers when they wake up, and from others, of course.

    [I can't resist a local example demonstrating the use of rear in relation to children:
    "Wurr ye rared in a feel??" ... which translates to
    ""Would you mind closing the door please."]
     
  2. Aupick

    Aupick Senior Member

    Strasbourg, France
    UK, English
    My own tendencies:

    bring up for children, most of the time
    raise for children, some of the time
    rear for children, never
    breed (yes, breed!) for children, in the expression 'born and bred in Manchester'. (But don't worry, only in this expression. I can't quite hear myself saying 'Breeding children is a full-time job' or 'I don't like the way some people breed their children these days'. :eek: )

    raise for animals, some of the time
    rear for animals, some of the time
    breed for animals, some of the time
     
  3. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod Chicken

    Arizona
    American English
    Here's an AE opinion:
    Except in the phrase that Aupick suggested, "Breed" has a different connotation for me than the other phrases here -- one that suggests husbandry and genetic engineering.

    breed for children :tick:
    The Earth is overpopulated because humans breed too much.
    (heard in the 80's) Yuppies shouldn't breed.
    My uncle is breeding German Shepherds. His bitch, Frau, is a purebred.
    -- Are you from Arizona?
    -- Born and bred!
     
  4. EmmaPeel Senior Member

    Toulouse, France
    France - French
    Doesn't breed then refer more at the 'species' aspect of humans than at parents bringing up their children ?
    ;)
     
  5. modgirl Senior Member

    USA English, French, Russian
    This is by no means a definitive source, but it gives the usage of rear for children:

    Animals are said to be raised while children are reared. It is increasingly common to use raised in both instances.

    http://www.tameri.com/edit/usage_nz.html

    I do think that raised is probably used more by the average person in the United States.
     
  6. EmmaPeel Senior Member

    Toulouse, France
    France - French
    I've found that rear is only used for the market; so... unless people will to sell their children on the market.... it cannot be used for children!!

    and officially (in dictionaries) raise can be a synonym for bring up ( children).
     
  7. modgirl Senior Member

    USA English, French, Russian
    Hi Emma, I'm not sure where you learned that, but it isn't at all true for American English! If you have an American dictionary, look up the word rear. Better writers tend to use it in literature although raised is becoming more popular.

    By the way, what do you mean that rear is only used for the market? Sorry, but that doesn't make sense. There are actually many uses of the word!

    There is also a book entitled Woe is I, written by a professional writer and editor to help people combat common mistakes found in writing. In it, the author discusses the raised/reared usage.
     
  8. Aupick

    Aupick Senior Member

    Strasbourg, France
    UK, English
    For what it's worth, here's what my (British) Concise OED says:

    rear 1a) bring up and educate (children). b breed and care for (animals)

    raise [...] 9 bring up; educate. 10 breed or grow (raise one's own vegetables).

    Well I'll be! Rear is in the opposite order from what I'd expect. (Raise vegetables!?)
     
  9. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    On the other hand, EmmaPeel is giving an entirely valid view - and isn't claiming it as true for AE. Especially as it IS true for BE, used near to where she lives, your comment seems a little brusque.
     
  10. EmmaPeel Senior Member

    Toulouse, France
    France - French
    I've looked up in the Merriam-Webser as I didn't know this word:
    to rear
     
  11. EmmaPeel Senior Member

    Toulouse, France
    France - French
    I find this post very interresting, because I regularly get stuck on whether to use "raise children" (which I tend to use because I've heard it and it's easier for me) or "bring up" that, from my french point of view sounded more formal.

    I've just discovered that I could say "breed good manners into a child" ;)
     
  12. modgirl Senior Member

    USA English, French, Russian
    For what it's worth, here's an unabridged definition from Webster's New World College Dictionary (I prefer dictionaries in book form):

    for the transitive verb: 1) to put upright; elevate 2) to build; erect
    3) grow or breed (animals or plants) 4) to bring up by educating, nurturing, training, etc; raise [to rear a child]

    This particular dictionary gives dennotations in historical order. Hence, number four would be the most recent.
     
  13. EmmaPeel Senior Member

    Toulouse, France
    France - French
    Other dictionaries seem to give care for (which applies to animal and children) as a synonym for rear. :D
     
  14. modgirl Senior Member

    USA English, French, Russian
    I haven't heard that usage, either!



    I raise zucchini.

    I grow zucchini.

    The word grow is what I've heard most often. Though, when you think about it, we really only help in the growth of vegetables by planting seeds in the sun and providing water.
     
  15. modgirl Senior Member

    USA English, French, Russian
    I agree it's a synonym, but the meaning isn't always the same.


    I was reared in France.

    I was cared for in France.



    Where were you reared (or raised or brought up)?

    Where were you cared for?


    I think care for describes any care given. And reared (or raised or brought up) refers to the process of growing into adulthood.



    The war veterans were cared for in the French hospital.

    He lives with and cares for his elderly grandmother.
     
  16. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Hey all;
    Here...

    I "care for" my son....
    or
    I "raise" my son..

    and
    If he does not listen to me his "rear" meets my hand..(kidding)..

    Same for animals..I "raise" puppies...."look after"..."care for"
    Same for Plants and veggies...

    tg
     
  17. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Used more for animals, for turnips, or for barn animals...?

    I reared my children, having participated in their breeding.
    I raise beautiful hemerocalis, and tomatoes and basil and fruit flies.
    I breed and cross-breed daylilies, and ill-will on the part of political opponents.

    I haven't rear-ended any of the latter lately, despite the temptation.
     
  18. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    I learned that "rear" was actually the correct verb to use for children - and that "raise" was to be used exclusively with animals. "Raise" is, however, the more commonly used verb in spoken American English.

    "Bring up" is, of course, a completely valid synonym (for children).
     
  19. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    And if the rearing and raising doesn't succeed, we can bring them up on charges of bad breeding.
     
  20. cirrus

    cirrus Senior Member

    Warwick
    UK English
    To my ears this is a definite BE/ AE gulf. For me 1 and 2 sound odd and if someone asked me the question using those words I think I would imagine they were being sarcastic if not hostile. Equally with 4 the phrase implies I had an illness. I was cared for in the hospital (I can't imagine being brought up in one).
     
  21. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Interesting in places:p
    I was really hoping to hear the words people actually use. It's not all that difficult to find out what the dictionaries have to offer:D
     
  22. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
    My most common usages: "I didn't bring you up to behave that way!" or, with apologies to those who already read this here:
    I might use it when my children misbehave in ways that I most certainly did not teach them. After putting a stop their behavior, I might give an embarrassed look to the observer and say "I really did not raise them in a barn."
     
  23. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Once upon a time...I found a cartoon in The New Yorker magazine. It showed a matron holding open the door of an extraordinarily messy bedroom, and saying to her friend,

    "This is our son Charlie's room. Charlie was raised by wolves."

    I clipped it out and pasted it on the refrigerator. The similarity to my son Charlie's room was striking.

    PS- name changed to protect my son "Charlie"'s privacy.
     

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