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Reason for somebody doing something?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by ohmyrichard, Sep 1, 2008.

  1. ohmyrichard Senior Member

    [FONT=&#23435]Hi, guys.[/FONT]
    [FONT=&#23435]Would you please tell me whether I can use the following sentence structure or not?[/FONT]
    [FONT=&#23435][/FONT]
    [FONT=&#23435]The reason for English speaker teachers to ask their Chinese students to pick an English given name is what you might be able to infer: Chinese names are a big challenge for their foreign tongues and they find what they have long been accustomed to more comfortable.[/FONT]
    [FONT=&#23435][/FONT]
    [FONT=&#23435]Should I always stick to "the reason for doing something"? I mean, should the above sentence be changed to :[/FONT]
    [FONT=&#23435][/FONT]
    [FONT=&#23435][FONT=&#23435]The reason for English speaker teachers asking their Chinese students to do pick an English name is what you might be able to infer: Chinese names are a big challenge for their foreign tongues and they find what they have long been accustomed to more comfortable.[/FONT][/FONT]
    [FONT=&#23435][FONT=&#23435] [/FONT][/FONT]
    [FONT=&#23435][FONT=&#23435]I wrote the original sentence in my letter to a pen pal. I just get confused about which structure is acceptable to native speakers' ears. [/FONT][/FONT]
    [FONT=&#23435][FONT=&#23435][/FONT][/FONT]
    [FONT=&#23435][FONT=&#23435]Thanks. [/FONT][/FONT]
     
  2. kitenok Senior Member

    Hi ohmyrichard,
    [FONT=&#23435][/FONT]As to the construction you ask about, my preference would be for the second variant, but the first is certainly understandable.

    More importantly, I would replace "English speaker teachers" with "English speaking teachers," or even "teachers who are native speakers of English." I admit this last noun phrase is unwieldy, but it leaves no room for ambiguity.
     
  3. Loob

    Loob Senior Member

    English UK
    My preference would be for a third option: The reason [why] English teachers ask their Chinese students to ...

    I would normally write this sentence without "why", since some people argue that it's illogical to have both "the reason" and "why". In conversation, I often say "the reason why".
     
  4. ohmyrichard Senior Member

    Thanks a lot. A follow-up question for you: May I say "native speaker teacher"? If not, how do you put it?
    Thanks
     
  5. ohmyrichard Senior Member

    Thanks a lot. Would you please enlighten me about in what sense some people think that it's illogical to have both "the reason" and "why"? Collins CoBuild English Usage says we can use talk about the reason why something happens or is done. It gives an example: There are several reasons why we can't do that. It goes on to say that if we are actually stating the reason, we do not use "why"; instead, we use a "that"-clause. The example sentence it gives is "The reason that Daniel had come under suspicion was that he's gone to work for Bob." However, I find it hard to differentiate the two situations. What's your feel?
    Thanks.
     

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