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Redeemed written in original/ancient/New Testament Greek

Discussion in 'Ελληνικά (Greek)' started by DrewDoggy, Jan 7, 2013.

  1. DrewDoggy New Member

    English
    Hi, I am looking to get a tattoo of redeemed in New testament greek. I read that the NT was written in all capital letters. so should i do it that way? But i believe the root is either, exagorazo or lytroo. So i need help with the way it is written.
     
  2. Nikolaos_Kandidatos

    Nikolaos_Kandidatos Senior Member

    Rethymno, Crete
    Finnish
    Hi,

    it seems both ἐξαγοράζω and λυτρῶ are used but λυτρῶ probably more and perhaps feels more appropriate. So the perfect participle would be λελυτρωμένος / λελυτρωμένη (depending on your gender). Also, googling λελυτρωμένος seems to point to sites where it is used in the appropriate theological sense (αἵματι Χριστοῦ λελυτρωμένος etc.). If you want to mimic the writing of the time of Christ, ΛΕΛΥΤΡΩΜΕΝΟΣ / ΜΕΝΗ should be reasonably close.
     
  3. Perseas Senior Member

    Athen
    Griechisch
    Next to N. Kandidatos' excellent post, I 'd like to add that the past participle of the same verb is λυτρωθείς m./ λυτρωθεῖσα f. and capitalized ΛΥΤΡΩΘΕΙΣ m./ ΛΥΤΡΩΘΕΙΣΑ f..
     
  4. DrewDoggy New Member

    English
    Ok so λυτρωθείς is the past? Like was redeemed or redeemed. Thats the more correct one?
     
  5. Perseas Senior Member

    Athen
    Griechisch
    λυτρωθείς = he who was redeemed
    λελυτρωμένος = he who has been redeemed
     
  6. DrewDoggy New Member

    English
    Ok thank both you guys so much :) your awesome!!! :)
     
  7. fdb Senior Member

    Cambridge, UK
    French (France)
    The perfect passive participle “redeemed” does not (by chance) actually occur anywhere in the NT. If you are thinking of the specifically Pauline concept of the Christian redeemed (literally: bought back) by the sacrifice of Christ’s blood, then you should know that the verb used by Paul is always ἐξαγοράζω not λυτρῶ.
     
  8. DrewDoggy New Member

    English
    Hmm ive seen both used though?
     
  9. fdb Senior Member

    Cambridge, UK
    French (France)
    Yes, ἐξαγοράζω is in Gal. 3,13; 4,5; Eph. 5,1; Col. 4,5
    λυτρῶ is in Luke 24,21; Titus 2,14; 1 Pet. 1,18.
     
  10. Nikolaos_Kandidatos

    Nikolaos_Kandidatos Senior Member

    Rethymno, Crete
    Finnish
    Good point, fdb. Λυτρῶ probably seemed more familiar to me because it is almost always used in the Old Testament LXX (carrying out a search in Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, I seem to get around 110 hits as opposed to just 2 for ἐξαγοράζω).

    However, in post-New Testament literature in general the participle λελυτρωμένος seems more common than ἐξηγορασμένος. Searching all texts later than 0 BC gives just 5 hits for ἐξηγορασμένος but around 167 for λελυτρωμένος/η. Even so ἐξηγορασμένος is used, if only a couple of times, in the required sense (together with αἵματι or αἵματι Χριστοῦ etc.) so it's certainly not wrong and, since fdb demonstrates the verb is preferred by Paul, it might just be what DrewDoggy is looking for.

    I have a slight feeling that ἐξαγοράζω in this sense is a more "down-to-earth" term (probably borrowed by Paul from a non-religious contemporary context like the ransoming of prisoners of war or slaves, in order to illustrate the practical meaning of the redemption ), while λυτρῶ is the traditional term and carries a more solemn feeling due to its extensive use in the Old Testament (at least to the hellenized Jews outside Palestine who read their OT in Greek translation). But I must stress that this is just a hunch and might be influenced by my Modern Greek. Maybe someone more informed could comment on this possible semantic difference?
     
  11. Perseas Senior Member

    Athen
    Griechisch
    Εξαγοράζω = bye off, bribe, bye out, ransom, redeem, suborn, corrupt
    Λυτρώνω = ransom, redeem, free, relieve

    Those are some meanings of the verbs we are discussing here according to my dictionary. I cited them to present a more complete picture, maybe you find them interesting. In addition, λυτρώνω is a synonym for σώζω (save), which is also an ancient verb but still in use. A difference between σώζω and λυτρώνω is that the latter is used in a more elevated style, it is more formal and would fit in theological contexts. Now, if DrewDoggy is interested precisely in the point referred to by fdb, it's ok. :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2013
  12. DrewDoggy New Member

    English
    Thank you guys
     
  13. JacksonChase New Member

    English - America
    Looking for a male version of the word Redeemed. Something along the lines of a definition "has been redeemed". Would maybe like a Koine version of this as it is in what the New Testament was written. Any help is appreciated thank you.

    Also this is for a tattoo, if that helps out in any way.
     
  14. JacksonChase New Member

    English - America
    Would the phrasing 'ΛΥΤΡΩΜΕΝΟΣ' be correct?
     
  15. Αγγελος Senior Member

    Greek
    If you want ancient (including hellenistic) Greek, you need the reduplication: ΛΕΛΥΤΡΩΜΕΝΟΣ
    ΛΥΤΡΩΜΕΝΟΣ is correct in modern Greek.
     

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