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Redundant

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Ariander, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. Ariander

    Ariander Junior Member

    USA
    English, USA
    I would like to ask about the word "redundant."


    In the case of two items which are basically the same, are both redundant?

    For example:

    "Graph A and B are redundant, so I have removed Graph B. Now Graph A contains the necessary information."

    Or, is only one of the items redundant?

    For example:

    "Graph B is redundant, so I have removed it. Now Graph A contains the necessary information."

    I'm leaning toward the first one, but am not entirely sure.

    Thank you so much!
     
  2. heypresto

    heypresto Senior Member

    South East England
    English - England
    If both graphs are redundant, as in your first example, I can't see how the removal of one of them could make the other suddenly non-redundant.

    Your second example, however, sounds more plausible. But only if Graph A had always contained the necessary information. Again, the removal of a redundant graph (B) can't suddenly make the other (A) non-redundant.
     
  3. Ariander

    Ariander Junior Member

    USA
    English, USA
    Thank you for your quick reply!

    In my example, I was imagining Graph B replicated some of the information in Graph A without adding any more information. To clarify, Graph A included information contained in Graph B, along with additional information. Graph A was not changed even after Graph B was removed.

    So maybe it would be better to remove the word "now" and write, "Graph B is redundant, so I have removed it. Graph A should contain the necessary information."
     
  4. jack_1313 Senior Member

    English - Australian
    Here is how I would articulate the idea that you're trying to express:

    "When both Graph A and B are included, one of them is mostly redundant. Thus, I have removed Graph B and incorporated all the necessary information into Graph A."

    "Now Graph A contains the necessary information" indicates that Graph A needed to be changed in some way to compensate for the absence of Graph B. This indicates that Graph B was not entirely redundant - it did contain some information that needed to be transfered over to Graph A. This is why I used the term "mostly redundant."
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2013
  5. jack_1313 Senior Member

    English - Australian
    OK, I wrote my last post before you posted the extra information.

    I think you've rephrased it well given the meaning that you intended, but are you sure you want to include the word "should"? That implies that there is a possibility that it might not contain the necessary information.
     
  6. heypresto

    heypresto Senior Member

    South East England
    English - England
    Yes, that should do it. I think it was the 'now' that caused the problems.
     
  7. Ariander

    Ariander Junior Member

    USA
    English, USA
    Thank you for your thoughtful posts.

    Good point on the word "should." This "should" should be left out. The inclusion was a result of a bad habit.
     

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