Release the hounds!

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by fenixpollo, Sep 28, 2010.

  1. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod Chicken

    Arizona
    American English
    The expression "release the hounds!" is used most often in a comedic context in modern American English. I'm not sure what the original context was (fox hunting? fugitive tracking? evil lord?), but in modern media, it is used when a wealthy person wants to chase someone off their property.

    For example, it has frequently been used in the Simpsons, when Monty Burns wants to get rid of someone, he will shout, "release the hounds!" The implication is that he has ferocious hunting dogs that are also trained to attack people, and that if they are let out of their pens, they will attack the intruder.

    Is there a similar expression in Spanish? Literally, it would be something like "¡suelten a los sabuesos!", but I'm not sure if this is an expression that is used historically, or if it is a set phrase like "release the hounds" has become in modern American entertainment.

    Any (relevant and thoughtful) ideas are welcome.
     
  2. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    Probably because I don't watch the Simpsons, I don't consider "release the hounds" to be comedic. I think more of traditional English fox hunting or coon hunting here in the U.S. from whence the metaphor comes.

    Similar verbs, such as, let slip," exist as well, such as in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar:
    Cry 'Havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war;
    That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
    Ergo, I would seek an equivalent Spanish term in these contexts.
     
  3. calamario Senior Member

    Dallas, TX
    Spanish - Chile, Peru, Argentina, US Hispanic
    In Argentina they use the expression "soltar los perros" when someone decides to go after a woman/man. It's just a flirting metaphor.
     
  4. Lyrica_Soundbite

    Lyrica_Soundbite Senior Member

    Argentina, español
    La adaptación al español hecha en México (no sé cómo será la de España) lo tradujo como "Smithers, suelte a los perros"
    Debo decir que para mí sonó perfecto =)


    Sdgraham, Monty Burns says that when he receive unexpected visitors (well, he hates any visitor) and wishes to get them out of his mansion.


    -Por favor, corrijan mis errores.-
    -Correct my mistakes, please.-
     
  5. Dateunavueltaenelaire Senior Member

    Spanish-Chile
    En Chile se dice también "échale (verbo echar, to throw something over somebody) a los perros", meaning "release the dogs so they attack him/her", en el mismo sentido utilizado por Mr. Burns.
     
  6. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod Chicken

    Arizona
    American English
    Thanks, guys. The way I understand these phrases:
    suelte los perros = release the dogs
    échale a los perros = throw him/her to the dogs

    These are two different ideas -- the first one being that the dogs would run after the intruder; the second one suggesting that the intruder would be thrown into the place where the dogs are.
     
  7. Dateunavueltaenelaire Senior Member

    Spanish-Chile
    I don't think there are two meanings there... "échale a los perros" means, literally, throw the dogs to somebody, so the dogs bite him/her off. To say what you meant on the second phrase you would have to say "échaselo/la a los perros" (throw him/her to the dogs). Saludos!
     
  8. JartiyRomi New Member

    Spanish and Catalan -Spain
    Thanks, guys. The way I understand these phrases:
    suelte los perros = release the dogs
    échale a los perros = throw him/her to the dogs

    These are two different ideas -- the first one being that the dogs would run after the intruder; the second one suggesting that the intruder would be thrown into the place where the dogs are.


    Fenixpollo, "échale (a) los perros" quiere decir lo mismo que "suéltale (a) los perros", porque los perros son lo que mandas hacia la persona en los dos ejemplos.

    Creo que lo que te ha confundido es el uso de la preposición "a". Puedes quitarla y lo verás más claro tal vez.

    Por cierto, que aquí en España también decimos soltar (a) los perros a alguien para intentar echarlo.

    Un saludo.
     
  9. JartiyRomi New Member

    Spanish and Catalan -Spain
    Dateunavueltaenelaire, en España no haría falta el "se", para que fuera la persona a la que tiramos a los perros, diríamos: "Échalo/ échala a los perros"
    También podríamos decirlo con el "se" pro suena más coloquial.
     
  10. fenixpollo

    fenixpollo Mod Chicken

    Arizona
    American English
    Hmm... I'm confused by the construction "échale a los perros", and by your translation of "throw the dogs to somebody". To my mind, it should be "échale los perros" (throw the dogs at him/throw him the dogs).

    The other phrase, "échaselos", makes sense to me if you are saying "throw (écha-) the dogs (-los-) at him (-se)".
     
  11. Dateunavueltaenelaire Senior Member

    Spanish-Chile
    Vale, entiendo, es sólo una diferencia regional, al parecer. En Chile la combinación "se+lo/la" en esas formas es lo más común, independiente de la formalidad del registro. :)
     
  12. Dateunavueltaenelaire Senior Member

    Spanish-Chile
    For another funny-childish example, if I were to say something like "make your mom to chase that boy off", diría "échale a tu mamá"... I'm not sure if it's gramatically right, but it is what you would say. :)
     
  13. JartiyRomi New Member

    Spanish and Catalan -Spain
    Exacto! Decimos "a" claramente para referirnos a personas y con los animales podemos elegir si poner la "a" o no.

    Fenixpollo, el "se" no se refiere a "him", se refiere a los perros se= "a ellos"
     
  14. Lyrica_Soundbite

    Lyrica_Soundbite Senior Member

    Argentina, español
    En todo caso, me resulta menos confuso usar el verbo arrojar:

    Release the dogs = Suelte /Suelta /Soltá /Suelten /Soltad a los perros
    Throw him/her to the dogs = Arrójelo/a /Arrójele /Arrójalo /Arrojalo /Arrójenlo /Arrojadlo a los perros




    -Por favor, corrijan mis errores.-
     

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