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Remain

Discussion in 'English Only' started by isabelgr, Jan 24, 2007.

  1. isabelgr Senior Member

    Bilbao
    UK/ENGLISH SPANISH
    Hello there and thanks for reading my post,

    I keep on coming across the following expression in letters and as I haven't used it i'd like to know what is more correct...

    At the end of the letter it says

    "Waiting for your prompt reply, we remain"
    "Thanking you in advance, I remain yours faithfully.."


    Thanks...
     
  2. la reine victoria Senior Member

    Thanking you in advance, I remain,
    Yours faithfully. :tick:

    LRV
    _____________________________
    :D We are frequently amused.:D
     
  3. winklepicker

    winklepicker Senior Member

    Kent
    English (UK)
    Dear Isabel,

    These terms (in BE) are hopelessly old-fashioned, and no one except fuddyduddies uses them. They went out with Queen Victoria - and she died in 1901. :) (Wait for a million foreros to disagree!)

    Some people like to say 'Best regards' - but I was told once that that was a solecism, so I always use 'Best wishes'.

    Best wishes

    WP
     
  4. Siberia

    Siberia Sibermod

    UK-Wales - English
    I'd say "awaiting your reply" without 'prompt'
    I wouldn't "thank in advance either" but that is because my teacher used to tell me it was never done. You just thanked so in this case.
    Thank you.
    I remain
    Yours faithfully.
     
  5. isabelgr Senior Member

    Bilbao
    UK/ENGLISH SPANISH
    Thanks for your help...

    Don't you think best wishes isn't formal enough for a business letter though?
     
  6. winklepicker

    winklepicker Senior Member

    Kent
    English (UK)
    Good question. I guess it depends who you are writing to? I've been writing business letters to senior UK businessmen for a long time, and I haven't either sent or received one with 'I remain...' in it for at least ten years.

    To be absolutely safe, you could go with Yours sincerely if you know the name of the person or Yours faithfully if not. Those will never be wrong:

    Dear Mr Smith.... Yours sincerely

    Dear Sir... Yours faithfully
     
  7. isabelgr Senior Member

    Bilbao
    UK/ENGLISH SPANISH
    I have just come across the "I remain" version myself, I meant 'best wishes' at the end. But of course, as you say it all depends who you are writing to.. Thanks for replying!
     

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