research - plural

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by PADISEBE, Jun 7, 2010.

  1. PADISEBE Junior Member

    Hi,
    I am not sure about the plural of research. Can you help me? Thank you!
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2015
  2. chamyto

    chamyto Senior Member

    Burgos, Spain
    Spanish
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2015
  3. micafe

    micafe Senior Member

    United States
    Spanish - Colombia
    "Researches".
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2015
  4. jackaustralia Senior Member

    Australia English
    No, I would argue "research" is uncountable because it doesn't sound right to say "Yesterday I did three researches." It would either be "Yesterday I did research" or "Yesterday I did three research assignments/cases/files" etc. The only time you would have "research" in plural is to refer to the person who does research or their job title. I.e. "We have three researchers." (Note the spelling- not "researches.")
     
  5. chamyto

    chamyto Senior Member

    Burgos, Spain
    Spanish
    It can be, but you can find plenty of pages if you look up "researches" at google.com
     
  6. jackaustralia Senior Member

    Australia English
    They refer to the job title or people who do research but I still maintain that you cannot say something like "I need to do five researchers" but instead "I need to do five pieces of research" or, depending on the context, "I need to do five research files." Note how the word "file" is made plural not research.
     
  7. micafe

    micafe Senior Member

    United States
    Spanish - Colombia
    Sorry, Jack. It can be a countable noun in some cases or, at least, it's starting to be used that way:

    research noun

    (also researches [plural]) a detailed study of a subject, especially in order to discover (new) information or reach a (new) understanding scientific/medical research
    a research student/assistant/laboratory

    They are carrying out/conducting/doing some fascinating research into/on the language of dolphins.
    His researches in the field of disease prevention produced unexpected results.

    (Definition of research noun from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary)

    Noun

    Singular
    research

    research (countable and uncountable; plural researches)

    1. (uncountable) Diligent inquiry or examination to seek or revise facts, principles, theories, applications, et cetera; laborious or continued search after truth.
    2. (countable) A particular instance or piece of research.
    -----------------------
    Languages are alive.. they keep changing. That's what's so fascinating about them. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2010
  8. Spug Senior Member

    Hi,

    This is an excellent example of the difference between what one finds in the dictionary and how one speaks. With respect to modern spoken English (at least in AmE), jack is absolutely right: we do not use the plural "researches". The fact that it's in the dictionary is secondary to modern usage.

    I don't recall ever hearing "researches" used as a plural noun, and I've been around a while. :)

    Saludos...
     
  9. EdisonBhola Senior Member

    Korean
    In modern usage, "researches" is wrong, I think.
     
  10. Wandering JJ

    Wandering JJ Senior Member

    England
    British English
    The Oxford dictionaries describe "research" as a mass noun, then say "also researches". However, the OED records usage, unlike the DRAE, which prescribes usage. I agree with Jack and Spug that the plural noun is not much used and in BE at least it sounds ugly.
     
  11. SevenDays Senior Member

    Spanish
    But "researches" does show its "count" face; for example, in contexts that suggest specificity (a research inspired by) or where the sense if "more than one" is strongly present (the researches conducted by our team; we conducted several researches into). Given that in science or academia is where one likely does "researches", I suspect such use is more likely to be found in that type of language.

    Cheers
     
  12. Wandering JJ

    Wandering JJ Senior Member

    England
    British English
    Interesting. When I search "the research conducted by our team" in Google, I get 4 pages of results; when I search "the researches conducted by our team", I get "No results found for "the researches conducted by our team""
     
  13. SevenDays Senior Member

    Spanish
    I know; "researches" shows up more readily when we add "several" (several researches), given that the plurality there is clearly established. If the team conducted more than one investigation, each separate and distinct from the others, "the research conducted by our team" does not represent the intended message. We'd have to use "researches" or, more likely I suppose, switch to "studies" or "investigations" (The studies conducted by our team).
     
  14. Wandering JJ

    Wandering JJ Senior Member

    England
    British English
    Well, you can use the noun in the plural, but I would not! I do work for a major research company and we would not dream of using "researches" in this way, preferring "studies" or "investigations". I agree that it is not incorrect to do as you suggest – who am I to go against the OED? ;)
     
  15. badbob001 New Member

    English - USA
    Or search for "separate researches". "We conducted five separate researches into this."
     

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