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riding up one's crack

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by ··pao²··, Feb 14, 2013.

  1. ··pao²··

    ··pao²·· Senior Member

    Italy
    Italy (Italian)
    Hi everyone,
    I was reading an article about Valentine's Day downsides this morning and I stumbled across a sentence that I found it hard to translate. Here it is, "From the over-priced steak dinner to the bright red lingerie that keeps riding up one's crack..."

    I can't figure out what "riding up one's crack" means. I hope some of you can help me out with that, thanks a lot!

    Here's my try, "Dal prezzo smisurato di una bistecca per cena, all'intimo rosso sgargiante che continua a salire... uhmm??"

    Happy Valentine's Day! ;)
     
  2. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Tenuto conto che crack è la fessura formata dalle natiche, non è difficile capire cosa significa "lingerie that keeps riding up one's crack.
     
  3. ··pao²··

    ··pao²·· Senior Member

    Italy
    Italy (Italian)
    Afferrato, grazie!
     
  4. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    The Urban dictionary gives a very nice academic discussion of "wedgies" "melvins" and "mervins" - analogous to your phrase.:)
     
  5. ··pao²··

    ··pao²·· Senior Member

    Italy
    Italy (Italian)
    Thanks a lot Tim, I'll have a look then! ;)
     
  6. RolandLavengro Junior Member

    Africa
    British English
    It is a reference to thongs which, instead of covering buttocks as do more traditional undergarments, comprise a thin strip of material which fits between them - .i.e., rides up one's crack. Here, 'ride up' is used as it is generally for clothes that shift position when worn, for example a jumper might ride up unwantedly to expose the tummy. 'Ride up' is commonly used in English, invariably by women, for whom an ever-growing and largely indecipherable esoteric language on clothing exists. Indeed pao2, I sympathize with your ignorance here. Just when one thought the anatomical nomenclature of fashion had been exhausted someone had to invent a garment that seeks out new frontiers and boldly rides up where no garment has ridden up before. The other part is, as you will have gathered by now, humorous journalism and would be mildly vulgar if not in context.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2013
  7. giginho

    giginho Senior Member

    Svizzera / Torino
    Italiano & Piemontese
    So, Roland, crack is a word you'd never use while talking with your granfather...it is vulgar, isn't it?
     
  8. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
  9. AlabamaBoy Senior Member

    Alabama, USA
    American English
    We disagree on this one. "Crack" is somewhat vulgar in polite company over here (USA) when used to refer to a part of the anatomy "where the sun does not shine" and would never be used for example with your church minister or choir director. We Yanks like to pretend that certain body parts don't exist when we are in "polite company." PS I think most of Roland's discussion (though witty) would be considered offensive and sexist if not misogynistic by liberated American women (such as for example, my youngest daughter).
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2013
  10. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    We don't disagree. It's vulgar over here too, as I told Gigi ;) (And Roland is only giving off about fashion vocabulary, which many women also find annoying ;))
     
  11. AlabamaBoy Senior Member

    Alabama, USA
    American English
    Ah, you answered no to a negative question. My mistake, I thought you were saying the opposite of what you said. My bad :(.
     
  12. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    I was answering "you'd never use this with your grandfather (would you)?" rather than "it is vulgar isn't it?" Sorry, that wasn't at all clear :D
     
  13. RolandLavengro Junior Member

    Africa
    British English
    Thank you for perspectiives and corrections. My apologies if my contribution was potentially or actually offensive. I understood the quote to refer to thongs, which cut into what is sometimes euphemistically and possibly offensively referred to as the 'bum cleavage'. I was not referring to the front of the item of underwear, which is more substantial and unlikely to be the part to which the article was referring. I would not use 'crack' in this context in England in polite society, but agree that 'vulgar' is a problematic term, so perhaps I should have used 'informal'. I take your point about sexism. It was irrelevant to the question and not very witty.
     
  14. In Italian we don't have a single specific word for crack (as we don't have for wedgie). This doesn't mean that we don't let our imagination fly. The back strip of a thong (even better of a g-string) is commonly called filo interdentale, while a terrible way of referring to someone wearing a "wedged" thong is "(S)he is being :warn:screwed:warn: by her/his thong"...
    In English to avoid being graphic and sexist.
     
  15. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    Ah, we also call it "dental floss" in English :D
     
  16. I should have imagined that, Tegs:D
     
  17. giginho

    giginho Senior Member

    Svizzera / Torino
    Italiano & Piemontese
    Hi All and Hi Chip!

    About your sentence here quoted: are you sure we do not have a specific (vulgar) word for crack? We (me and my friends, but I can bet we are not the only ones) call it "spaccazza"

    Tegs: thank you for your help!
     
  18. Hi giginho!

    Thank you for correcting and updating me!

    Conoscevo la parola "spaccozza" con la o, ma con riferimento all'altro ...ehm ... canale:D.
     
  19. giginho

    giginho Senior Member

    Svizzera / Torino
    Italiano & Piemontese
    Eheheh! io invece non conoscevo questa parola!!
     

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