rolar

Discussion in 'Português (Portuguese)' started by addy25, May 22, 2011.

  1. addy25 Senior Member

    London
    British English
    Hey guys. A bit baffled on the use of the word 'rolar'. Not to sure if this sentence makes any sense to me. Hope one of you can clear it up for me :)


    acho bom não rolar ressaca amanhã, já basta uma curtindo uma!


    Thank you!
     
  2. Vanda

    Vanda Moderesa de Beagá

    Belo Horizonte, BRASIL
    Português/ Brasil
    rolar- slang

    acho bom não rolar ressaca amanhã, já basta uma curtindo uma!

    I hope no hangover happens tomorrow. It is enough the one I have now.
     
  3. alkeyam Junior Member

    San Diego, CA. U.S.A.
    Español venezolano
    Hey Vanda. I have a few other questions but I'm not sure if I'll have to create another thread. I'll go ahead and ask them, anyways.

    The sentence "acho bom não rolar ressaca amanhã, já basta uma curtindo uma!" literally means in English:

    I find good a hangover not to happen tomorrow. It's enough one liking one.

    So, one of my questions is in regards to the use of: "acho bom". What other meaning does it have? Does it also mean: "I hope"? Or, is it just because of this particular use of words: "acho bom não rolar"?

    Is "uma curtindo uma" an idiom? Or is there another meaning for the verb curtir besides "to like"?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  4. mglenadel

    mglenadel Senior Member

    Rio de Janeiro
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Lots of questions. let's go one by one:

    "Acho bom" means (in this case) "It better" (as in "it better not rain tomorrow"). "I hope" is another possibility, but "acho bom" has a strong "threat" component to it, like the person saying it is ready to get angry if the thing does not happen.

    "Rolar" is a slang, as Vanda said before, meaning "to happen" ("Esse jogo vai rolar ou não?" = "Is this game happening or not?"/"Are we gonna play?")

    "Curtir" does not means just "liking" something, but also "experiencing" something ("Me deixe! Estou curtindo um som." = "Leave me alone! I'm listening to [my] music!"). In its original sense, it means to tan (like an animal hide) or to pickle (like olives).


    As for the original sentence, without more context I'm not sure, but it may be translated as: "I'm better not wake up hungover tomorrow [too]. One day nursing a hangover is enough!"
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2014
  5. Galisisk New Member

    portuguese
    Curtir means to like something or to enjoy doing something. In the case of "curtindo uma" it's actually an irony. Something like "Better not have a hangover tomorrow, I'm enjoying one already."
     
  6. AlexSantos Junior Member

    Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    "Acho bom não rolar" means something like "it better not happen". The sentence "acho bom não rolar ressaca amanhã, já basta uma curtindo uma!" is, however, not idiomatic in Portuguese, but this was probably the result of a typo on the part of the OP. The correct sentence would be "acho bom não rolar ressaca amanhã, já basta eu curtindo uma!" which roughly means "I better not have a hangover tomorrow, I've had enough of this one" but keep in mind that curtir literally means "to enjoy" and is being used in a very sarcastic tone, and rolar is slang for "to happen".

    It's also possible to use "É melhor que" (lit.: it's better that) instead of "Acho bom" without any loss in meaning, in which case the main verb assumes its present subjunctive inflection. Thus, "acho bom não rolar ressaca" = "É melhor que não role ressaca".
     
  7. alkeyam Junior Member

    San Diego, CA. U.S.A.
    Español venezolano
    Alright. Thanks for your responses. I have a few other questions.

    So, the sentence could be like this as well "Acho bom não rolar ressaca amanhã (porque se não vou ficar chateado)"?

    Could you also replace the slang verb "rolar" with "acontecer" as in "Acho bom não acontencer ressaca amanhã"?

    Is the construction "Acho bom" the only way to say "I better" or is there another more formal/informal way to say it for the 1st person singular?

    What about "She/He/They/You/We better"? Ela/Ele/Você/Vocês/A gente/Nós/Eles/Elas acha/acham/achamos bom?

    As for the the second part of the sentence: " já basta uma curtindo uma!"
    I'm not trying to take the meaning literally but could the first "uma" refer to "uma pessoa" as in "me" in a similar way that "a gente" refers to "we"?
    So, kind of like: It's enough one(me) experiencing/enjoying one?

    Thanks in advance and sorry for asking so many questions!
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2014
  8. Jabir

    Jabir Senior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    I really have no idea what the first "uma" is refering to... "uma curtindo uma"...?
     
  9. AlexSantos Junior Member

    Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Your 1st sentence sounds fine but "Achamos/acham bom" doesn't. I'd say that "acho bom" is a fixed expression and it would be fairly unusual for the verb to be inflected since it expresses some sort of wish that always implies the will of the speaker himself and does not concern the will of anyone else (or 2nd or 3rd persons for that matter).

    You could say something like "Acho bom você/ele/a gente não ter uma ressaca" for "You/he/we better not have a hangover" but never "Acha/Achamos bom ele não ter uma ressaca" which literally means "he/we think(s) it's good for him not to have a hangover".

    I think that's a valid assumption. As I stated before "já basta uma curtindo uma" could hardly be considered a coherent sentence on its own. It was probably meant to be "já basta eu curtindo uma" unless the speaker omitted a noun between uma and curtindo, in which case it would be safe to assume that the missing word stands for "pessoa" in much the same vein as the other uma stands for "ressaca". Putting the bits together, the full sentence would be "já basta uma (pessoa) curtindo uma (ressaca)" (one person enjoying a hangover is enough)
     
  10. alkeyam Junior Member

    San Diego, CA. U.S.A.
    Español venezolano
    Perfect! Thanks for all your responses.

    Acho bom aprender depois desse monte de perguntas, já basta eu perguntando mais uma. :)
     
  11. maddymvr New Member

    English - England
    I have come across the word "rolar" in this context:

    "Coleccionadora de homens, tinha de rolar paixao, amor, sentimento."

    Any suggestions as to how to translate this?
     
  12. mglenadel

    mglenadel Senior Member

    Rio de Janeiro
    Brazilian Portuguese
    "[as] A collector of men, [for her] [relationships (even fleeting ones)] had to have passion, love, feeling."
     

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