Rumour has it that...

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by MarioQ, Aug 8, 2012.

  1. MarioQ

    MarioQ Junior Member

    Caracas, Venezuela
    Español (Venezuela)
    Well, I know what 'Rumour/rumor has it that...' means (se rumorea que...), but I don't know if it is necessary to use 'that'. Why do I get this doubt? Because I've heard in songs and movies that people omit that and only use 'rumour has it... blahblahblah'.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2012
  2. marirl84 New Member

    Brasil
    Brazilian Portuguese
    It is necessary to use "that" if you're continuing the phrase, explaining what is it "that" rumor has... The expression "rumor has it" by it self doesn't mean "se rumorea QUE..." it means only "se rumorea". So "that" is a necessary conjunction here to connect the next sentence with the expression. I hope I was clear enough.
     
  3. kayokid

    kayokid Senior Member

    Chicago
    English, USA
    Hello. I tend to agree that, strictly speaking 'that' should be included in the sentence. Quite often the conjunction is omitted, however, particularly in AmE speech.

    Ex. 'Rumor has it, he is going to make an appearance.'
     
  4. Peterdg

    Peterdg Senior Member

    Belgium
    Dutch - Belgium
    I, on the other hand, think that "that" can safely be omitted here.

    Look at this thread in the "English only" forum.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2012
  5. marirl84 New Member

    Brasil
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Yes... I also agree. But just because the comma forces a pause in the speech.
     
  6. MarioQ

    MarioQ Junior Member

    Caracas, Venezuela
    Español (Venezuela)
    It was obvious that I have to use 'that' in order to be grammatically correct, but there are lots of idioms, specially in AmE.

    Thanks for clarify, I knew I had heard it before, but I didn't know if it was possible and when I can omit that. And yes, most of the time I've heard it in AmE except for the Adele's song.

    I consider that the comma makes it better grammatically too because of the marirl84's reason. And well, a native speaker is helping me!

    Thanks again! :)
     
  7. James2000 Senior Member

    English - South Africa
    I'd agree, even without a comma.

    Rumour has it she's getting married.

    I can't cite any sources to justify my beliefs, so wait for some other opinions.
     
  8. Trailbosstom

    Trailbosstom Senior Member

    Arizona
    American English
    "That" is optional. It very often is in other English sentences too: I told him I wanted to go. I told him that I wanted to go. Both perfect.

    I don't care for the comma. "Rumor has it, he's rich." I've never seen a comma used in such a way. If it serves to make a pause, it's incorrect as there is no pause there, and since when does a comma take the place of "that?"

    I've stopped worrying about split infinitives. They've always been perfectly grammatical. It is only rumored that they are incorrect. You know, the same way that it is said you aren't supposed to end a sentence with a preposition, a claim made by those who don't know about what they speak! :)
     
  9. Peterdg

    Peterdg Senior Member

    Belgium
    Dutch - Belgium
    I know, I know:D. I just corrected it to avoid any discussion on that topic.:eek:
     
  10. Trailbosstom

    Trailbosstom Senior Member

    Arizona
    American English
    Yes, there are some discussions up with which we needn't put!
     
  11. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Rumor has it Chick-fil-A is a problem.
     
  12. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    I'd insist on the comma to separate two its, as in "Rumor has it, it is not necessarily important", but not between an it and a he (or a Chick-Fil-A).
     
  13. MarioQ

    MarioQ Junior Member

    Caracas, Venezuela
    Español (Venezuela)
    I see the comma isn't necessary at all... And you have a point in "since when does a comma take the place of "that?""

    Thanks everybody!

     
  14. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain (Madrid)
    Hello, Forero.

    I understand that you say that the comma is necessary only when we have two consecutive its. But we wouldn't need a comma if we place that in between: Rumor/Rumour has it that it ... Is this right?

    Saludos.
     
  15. Wandering JJ

    Wandering JJ Senior Member

    England
    British English
    There is no need for a comma in any of the suggestions given. In fact, I would consider use of a comma to be incorrect. If you don't like "it it" then stick a "that" between them!

    I have no problem with "it it" in everyday speech: "rumour has it it's going to be another warm day tomorrow". No comma, no "that", no problem.
     
  16. Mackinder

    Mackinder Senior Member

    Bogota
    Espagnol - Colombie
    I agree: placing the comma is an error.
     
  17. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain (Madrid)
    Yes, I would not use a comma either. But both Forero and Kayokid did, and I wonder why. Hope they can share their thoughts with us.
     
  18. Wandering JJ

    Wandering JJ Senior Member

    England
    British English
    American punctuation?! he whispers...
     
  19. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    Yeah, blame it on us ...
    You often see a comma before a doubled word, especially in quotes, which you can't rephrase. It's for clarity. I don't have a problem with it.
     
  20. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    I got used to seeing the comma, and it's comfortable. "The Economist" doesn't use it, of course.
    And the 'that' can be perfectly avoided (at least in Chicago). I'm so proud of my city...
     
  21. gringuitoloco Senior Member

    Florida
    American (awesome) English
    Wouldn't it be better to use a colon instead of a comma? "Rumor has it: she is getting laid off tonight."
    I don't understand why there would be a comma...
     
  22. duvija

    duvija Senior Member

    Chicago
    Spanish - Uruguay
    But English really doesn't like colons or semi-colons. If anything, you use a comma, don't you?
     
  23. k-in-sc

    k-in-sc Senior Member

    You shouldn't use any punctuation there.
    Colons and semicolons are generally for formal writing. Semicolons are "weak," like passive voice is "weak."
     

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