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  1. Mustermisstler

    Mustermisstler Senior Member

    England
    Spanish.Spain
    Hi guys,

    How do you say "sacar sangre" in English ?

    some context:

    Hoy he ido al médico y me han sacado sangre.

    My translation attempt:

    I went to the doctor today and had blood drawn / had blood taken

    Thanks
     
  2. Robañero Senior Member

    SE Wisconsin, USA
    American English
    Either way is ok, but "blood drawn" is the common expression in America.

    Tecnicamente, tu frase se traduce como:

    I have been to the doctor today and they have drawn blood.


    Of course we don't narrate the past that way (usually) and the way you wrote it is correct for normal conversational English
     
  3. lauranazario Moderatrix

    Puerto Rico
    Puerto Rico/Español & English
    Saludos,
    LN
     
  4. Alisterio

    Alisterio Senior Member

    Mexico City
    UK English
    Today I went to the doctor and he took some blood / took a blood sample.
     
  5. lauranazario Moderatrix

    Puerto Rico
    Puerto Rico/Español & English
    Just for clarification purposes... in many parts of the world doctors/physicians do not draw blood to collect samples... they send their patients to a lab where the lab technician takes care of this task.

    Saludos,
    LN
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012
  6. Mustermisstler

    Mustermisstler Senior Member

    England
    Spanish.Spain
    so let me get this straight guys,
    to have blood drawn = US English ?
    to have blood taken = UK English ?
     
  7. Alisterio

    Alisterio Senior Member

    Mexico City
    UK English
    Good question. "I had some blood drawn" or "the doctor drew some blood" sounds like something someone would say in the 18th century, to my (BE) ears. It's not incorrect, though, and would be perfectly well understood.
     
  8. Robañero Senior Member

    SE Wisconsin, USA
    American English
    De Acuerdo. Even the original has the plural "han sacado". In English we would never say "he drew blood" but always "they". Going to the "doctor", or "doctor's" naturally implies a group of people in the modern vernacular
     
  9. albertovidal

    albertovidal Senior Member

    Bs.As.-Argentina
    Castellano, Argentina
    And "blood extraction"?
     
  10. lauranazario Moderatrix

    Puerto Rico
    Puerto Rico/Español & English
    Esa construcción no forma parte del léxico médico normal en los Estados Unidos, Puerto Rico y otras partes del mundo, según evidenciado en los "posts" anteriores.

    Saludos,
    LN
     
  11. albertovidal

    albertovidal Senior Member

    Bs.As.-Argentina
    Castellano, Argentina
    Blood test (section Extraction)
    A blood test is a laboratory analysis performed on a blood sample that is usually taken by a nurse. Nurses are those charged with patients blood extraction.

    Saludos
     
  12. lauranazario Moderatrix

    Puerto Rico
    Puerto Rico/Español & English
    La fuente que pones omite un posesivo que te hace ver que blood extraction no es un término, sino una acción.

    La frase debería leer:
    Nurses are those charged with patients' blood extraction.
    (Las enfermeras son quienes están a cargo de sacarle sangre a los pacientes.)​


    Saludos,
    LN
     
  13. albertovidal

    albertovidal Senior Member

    Bs.As.-Argentina
    Castellano, Argentina
    En realidad, fue un error de tipeo de mi parte.
    El texto que cito dice "...with patients's blood extraction"
    Saludos
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012
  14. Spug Senior Member

    Hola alberto,

    Entonces la fuente está equivocada. Lo que puso lauranazirio (patients' blood extraction) es correcto.

    Robañero... "Tecnicamente, tu frase se traduce como: I have been to the doctor today and they have drawn blood."

    I have to disagree with you. Mustermisslter's translation of Hoy he ido al médico y me han sacado sangre as I went to the doctor today and had blood drawn / had blood taken is perfectly correct. He/she has translated the meaning, not the words. The use of the present perfect tense in peninsular Spanish to refer to completed actions in the recent past is completely normal, whereas in most of Latin America the preterite would be used (Hoy fui al médico y me sacaron sangre). There are literally dozens of threads about this in this forum.
     
  15. albertovidal

    albertovidal Senior Member

    Bs.As.-Argentina
    Castellano, Argentina
  16. lauranazario Moderatrix

    Puerto Rico
    Puerto Rico/Español & English
    Alberto, me parece que hace lo indecible por aferrarte al vocablo.

    Esta segunda cita me permite ver que aún no has logrado comprender que aquí "blood extraction" no se trata de un término médico sino que es la descripción de un acto, de una acción.

    Saludos,
    LN
     
  17. Robañero Senior Member

    SE Wisconsin, USA
    American English
    We are all splitting hairs with this one.

    In America, all three are perfectly well understood:

    I'm having blood drawn (Most common in US)

    I'm having blood taken (Less common, but frequently used anyway)

    I'm having blood extracted. (Perfectly well understood, sounds like you are trying to sound fancy)


    @Spug...yes I get it, hence my final comment on that post stating she was correct to translate it the way she did because we narrate the past with the preterit in English...
     
  18. voltape Senior Member

    Lima, Peru
    Peruvian Spanish/USA English
    Si deseo escribir: "Vino el técnico de laboratorio y me sacó sangre para análisis"

    ¿Sería entonces: "The lab technician came and drew blood for analysis"?

    Pero asi no está claro a quien le sacaron la sangre. En castellano es preciso. "me sacó sangre"

    ¿Se podría poner: "The lab technician came and drew ME blood for analysis"?

    Gracias
     
  19. FromPA

    FromPA Senior Member

    Philadelphia area
    USA English
    I wouldn't say any of these in colloquial speech. I'd say, "I'm having blood work done."
     
  20. voltape Senior Member

    Lima, Peru
    Peruvian Spanish/USA English
    Thanks, but in my case, how could I fit it?

    Si deseo escribir: "Vino el técnico de laboratorio y me sacó sangre para análisis"


    ¿Se podría poner: "The lab technician came and .....

    a) drew ME blood for analysis"?
    b) did blood work on me??
    c) ???
    How could I best express the original Spanish idea, "me sacó sangre"

    Gracias
     
  21. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Diría "The lab technician came and took a sample of my blood."
     
  22. FromPA

    FromPA Senior Member

    Philadelphia area
    USA English
    ...he drew blood for testing.

    You don't need to specify "on/from me" because it's understood from the context and it sounds superfluous (to me, anyway).
     
  23. Robañero Senior Member

    SE Wisconsin, USA
    American English
    The lab technician came and drew MY blood for analysis
     
  24. voltape Senior Member

    Lima, Peru
    Peruvian Spanish/USA English
    thank you very much to all!
     
  25. Robañero Senior Member

    SE Wisconsin, USA
    American English
    The lab technician came and drew MY blood for analysis. The actual blood work happens later in the lab. The technician is merely going to "draw" it.
     

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