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sana sana potito/culito/colita de rana

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by spn300mike, Sep 28, 2008.

  1. spn300mike New Member

    English US
    Hay alguien que me pueda explicar este refrán?

    ¿Es algo que se refiera a la medicina popular?
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2014
  2. alexacohen

    alexacohen Senior Member

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Conozco algo parecido, pero no tiene nada que ver con la medicina popular, sino con una canción que se les cantaba a los niños pequeños cuando se hacían "pupa".

    Sana, sana, colita (culito) de rana
    Si no sanas hoy sanarás mañana.
     
  3. carlingüismos Senior Member

    Madrid/Extremadura
    Spain/UK - English/Spanish
    The one I use is;
    Sana, sana, culito de rana
    Si no sanas hoy sanarás mañana.

    This is a classic for kids, when they've just bumped their heads, fallen over, etc. More than popular medicine, it corresponds to those cute and quaint sayings we have for children, whilst giving them a rub on the injured spot. And, I would love to know an english equivalent!!

    "Heal, heal, little frog's bottom
    If you don't heal today, you'll heal tomorrow"

    I think (not sure on this one) "potito" is another, perhaps latin american, word for culito (bottom).
     
  4. spn300mike New Member

    English US
    Muchas gracias, la fuente es un cuento de Pedro Lemebel que, por cierto, merece la pena,"La transfiguración de Miguel Angel".

    Se puede encontrar en línea pero WF aún no me permite incluir enlaces en mis respuestas.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2014
  5. Masood Senior Member

    Leicester, England
    British English
    What an endearing little rhyme. I can't think of an English equivalent, either. The best I can come up with is "Whoops-a-daisy!".
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2014
  6. Con mis sobrinos siempre decimos sana sana colita de rana... y la verdad no hay algo asi en inglés. Tengo unos amigos que no hablan español y dicen sana sana con sus hijos porque no pueden pensar en algo mejor.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2014
  7. SydLexia Senior Member

    London
    UK, English
    "Let me/I'll kiss it better" is/was used in the UK but I don't know any rhyme.

    syd
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2014
  8. Vampiro

    Vampiro Senior Member

    Emiratos Árabes
    Chile - Español
    It is... in Chile.
    All the best.
    _
     
  9. aurilla Senior Member

    Puerto Rico
    Am Eng/PR Spanish
    In Puerto Rico, we use the "culito" version. :D

    Sana, sana, culito de rana
    Si no sana hoy sanará mañana.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2014
  10. Vampiro

    Vampiro Senior Member

    Emiratos Árabes
    Chile - Español
    “Culo” is a rude word in Chile.
    That’s why we use the “potito” version with kids.
    :D
    _
     
  11. lapachis8 Senior Member

    El Defectuoso
    Mexico-Spanish
    Hi:
    An equivalent would be:

    "There, there."

    Cheers
     
  12. Vampiro

    Vampiro Senior Member

    Emiratos Árabes
    Chile - Español
    Pero "there, there" no rima ni con "sana, sana", ni con "culito de rana"... :confused:
    _
     
  13. lapachis8 Senior Member

    El Defectuoso
    Mexico-Spanish
    Hola:
    No, Vampi. Pero así se les dice a los niños para consolarlos o confortarlos en el mundo anglo, cuando se pegan o cuando lloran.
    Saludos.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2014
  14. Mirlo

    Mirlo Senior Member

    Missouri
    Castellano, Panamá/ USA
    I agree with Lapachis, It's use when a kid gets hurt and you are trying to make him fell better, something like:

    Get well little frog
    if not today,
    then tomorrow.
     
  15. Vampiro

    Vampiro Senior Member

    Emiratos Árabes
    Chile - Español
    Estoy de acuerdo en que son expresiones equivalentes.
    La diferencia es que en español es muy común hacer estos juegos con palabras que riman entre sí:
    Ejemplos:

    "Sana, sana, culito de rana
    si no sana hoy, sanará mañana."

    "Debes hacer la dieta del lagarto:
    comer poco y cagar harto"

    Etc.

    En varias oportunidades me ha tocado tratar de explicarles expresiones similares a inglich-hablantes, y casi nunca entienden que se trata sólo de un juego de palabras, sin ninguna lógica muchas veces.

    Saludos.
    _
     
  16. carlingüismos Senior Member

    Madrid/Extremadura
    Spain/UK - English/Spanish
    Thanks Vamp!
     
  17. JazzByChas

    JazzByChas Senior Member

    I would agree that this is what we would say in English.
    I don't know of any rhyme in English, but I might try:

    Let me kiss the place where you're feeling some pain
    If it doesn't feel better I'll do it again

    or

    All those mean "boo-boo's"
    that hurt your li'l bottom
    Just leave it to me and we'll say that we got 'em!


     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2013
  18. JazzByChas

    JazzByChas Senior Member

    Some other thoughts on this children's rhyme:

    My little frog's bottom, don't despair or have sorrow
    What may ail you today will be gone by tomorrow

    Get better, be well, my little frog's bottom
    Germies bit you today, but tomorrow we've got 'em.


    (I love to write rhyme) :D
     
  19. markmax New Member

    english/spanish
    Amigos, the legend of the rana is over 500 years old. In fact there are two sayings one found primarily in Mexico the other in Puerto Rico.
    They can be interchanged as the meaning is not taken literally in the first case, but is more accurately described in the second.
    The entire phrase is sana sana, culito de rana or colita de rana, si no sana hoy sana manana or ( sanarase) manana
    In Puerto Rico where I learned of the legend we said sana que sana at the beginning.
    However the key to the legend is the intention of the caregiver. Translated it is by the butt or tail of the frog.
    In fact there is a frog in Ecuador that has a secretion from its tali that is 200 times more powerful than morphine and deadly to the direct touch!
    Heal, heal by the tail of the frog if it doesn't get better today it will heal tomorrow.
    Now every hispanic child heard this growing up. Just about every time the child was injured, hurt or feeling depressed either abuela ,momma or tia would comfort
    them by rubbing ever so gently and repeat the saying. One always felt better.stopped crying and was on his way to a good day.
    The legend is in every hispanic country and culture. It circled the globe compliments of the conquistadores who learned its secret from the natives of South America.
    They used the rana for centuries prior to the Spaniards arrival.
     

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