1. PouletteAuCurry Junior Member

    French
    Bonjour,

    Je cherche à traduire le dialogue parent/enfant suivant : "Santa Claus is coming --This Santa- are his claws big ?"

    Je sèche complètement. Peut-être avec une autre créature imaginaire ?

    Si certains d'entre vous ont une idée, ça m'aiderait beaucoup !
     
  2. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    I would think that if you were translating it, you would use "Papa Noël" or "le Père Noël" and make a pun involving "papa" or "père."
     
  3. petit1 Senior Member

    français - France
    Le pape à Noël ??? Bof bof!

    "Pourquoi il vient le pape?"
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2013
  4. Uncle Bob Senior Member

    Hungary
    British English
    Lacan had a good pun with "père": les non-dupes errent:)!!
     
  5. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    Because the child is obviously not familiar with Santa's full name, (We often just say "Santa," short for "Santa Claus"), he understands "Claus" to be "claws."
    I like Petit1's rendering of the child's response: "Le pape à Noël ? Pourquoi il vient le pape ?":thumbsup:

    While "les non-dupes errent" is a pun involving "père," I don't see how it could work in PouletteAuCurry's context of a parent telling their child "le Père Noël arrive" and that child not understanding "Père Noël."
     
  6. jetset

    jetset Senior Member

    France\Nice
    French
    The Futurama series used this pun too, when Zoidberg receives a Xmas card from a relative. The translation was much easier as the character is a lobster (a play on word around "je te serre la pince"). When the pun is too far-streched, sometimes it is better to make one up that fits the local language, what dubbing teams use to do - no ideas so far....
     
  7. Uncle Bob Senior Member

    Hungary
    British English
    Well, it was you who suggested a pun on "père", I only provided one. Perhaps one should refer to Bettelheim's psychoanalysis of fairy tales ("The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales") to know whether a child would cotton on. I admit that I am not being too serious though.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2013
  8. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    Actually, what I suggested was using "Papa Noël" or "le Père Noël" and making a pun involving "papa" or "père" (See Post #2).:)

    P.S. If it helps to inspire anyone, note that the original title of this thread (when I first posted to it) was "Jeu de mots Santa Claus / Claws"
     
  9. Uncle Bob Senior Member

    Hungary
    British English
    Pernod, elle le boit? Though hopefully a child wouldn't ask that.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2013
  10. Oddmania

    Oddmania Senior Member

    France
    French
    Salut,

    Je cherche quelque chose depuis tout à l'heure, et je me demande s'il serait possible de bidouiller un jeu de mot avec les rennes/reines ?

    — Le Père Noël arrive avec ses rennes!
    — Est-ce qu'il a des princesses en plus des reines??

    Quelque chose du genre.
     
  11. Fred_C

    Fred_C Senior Member

    France
    Français
    Oui, moi je trouve ça bien.
    C'est simple, adapté à la bouche d'un enfant, et ça n'a pas l'air de "revenir de loin".
     
  12. pointvirgule

    pointvirgule Senior Member

    Mtl, QC
    Français
    — Le Père Noël arrive parmi nous.
    Je croyais que son traîneau était tiré par des rennes.


    ... J'aime mieux l'idée d'Oddmania. ;)
    Bonne année tout le monde.
     
  13. Uncle Bob Senior Member

    Hungary
    British English
    I love ;'s suggestion, though I must admit I had to read it three times to understand.
     
  14. PouletteAuCurry Junior Member

    French
    Hi everyone,
    Thank you all for these suggestions ! I loved this one : papa / pape (but it didn't fit the context as the line is said by a very little child (maybe 3 or 4 yo).
    I also liked the reines/rennes one, but it can't do either because it's a comic strip and the drawing shows a frightened child hiding behind his daddy's legs.
    I've thought of other characters like the Croquemitaine but it wouldn't be a pun anymore as it literally means "the one who eats little hands" and any child would be rightfully afraid of that one.

    I told the publisher all that and he told me we might just drop that strip...
     
  15. Oddmania

    Oddmania Senior Member

    France
    French
    Je pense que ça reste facilement arrangeable : "Et ces reines, est-ce qu'elles sont toutes aussi méchantes que celle de Banche-Neige ?", quelque chose comme ça.
     
  16. Lly4n4 Senior Member

    Paris (ex-Grand Ouest)
    Français (France)
    Maybe "la fée des dents" ?
    - La fée des dents va venir !
    - Cette fée, elle vient me manger ?
    / Elle vient pour arracher mes dents ?

    (I have always found this creature to be disturbing...)
     
  17. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    Well now, 14 posts in, we know the full context! I guess that explains why you said in your OP "Peut-être avec une autre créature imaginaire ?"--a reasoning which made no sense to me at the time. Now that we finally know that the child is supposed to be frightened by what he thinks he hears, maybe someone can come up with a suitable equivalent. Just so people don't waste their time, is anything else depicted in the strip which would effect the meaning or does it just show a frightened child hiding behind his father? Context is everything...
     
  18. Alsako

    Alsako Senior Member

    français de France
    Il me semble qu'elle ne vient pas en France. Elle s'y fait représenter par la Petite Souris.
     
  19. PouletteAuCurry Junior Member

    French
    Sorry LanguageHound, I didn't mean to waste anyone's time. That is indeed all it shows. Also, as I said, we might just drop that strip. Neither the publisher, nor the the author want to end up with a strip with a completely different meaning.
    Thank you everyone for trying to help !

    PouletteAuCurry.
     

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