SBC: Не hasn't worked here a year and already wants to leave

Discussion in 'Other Slavic Languages' started by kloie, Jan 12, 2013.

  1. kloie Senior Member

    houston tx
    american english from texas
    I would like to know how to sayНе hasn't worked here a year and already wants to leave.
    in russian it is
    Он и года не работает здесь, а уже хочет уходить.
    thanks in advance
     
  2. Duya Senior Member

    Not in WR world
    Whatever
    There are many variations in word order, choice of tenses, and verb selection (hteti/želeti are mostly synonymous). For example:

    Nije radio ovde ni godinu dana, a već želi da ode.

    or:

    Ni godinu dana nije ovdje radio, a već bi htio otići.
     
  3. kloie Senior Member

    houston tx
    american english from texas
    Isn't it better to say On radi because he still works it is not yet in the past?
     
  4. Duya Senior Member

    Not in WR world
    Whatever
    Both would be OK. From the second part if the sentence, which is in present, it is clear that he's still working here. We don't have a special tense for present perfect, as the context solves most ambiguities.
     
  5. Duya Senior Member

    Not in WR world
    Whatever
    Now, a followup of my own: Ni in this sentence makes a world of difference:

    Ni godinu dana ne radi ovde. 'He hasn't been working here for a full year', i.e. He's been working here for ten months, but not longer.

    versus

    Godinu dana ne radi ovde. 'He hasn't been working here for a year', i.e. He used to work here, but not since the last year.

    How do other languages solve that ambiguity? How is it clearly expressed in English?
     
  6. Tassos

    Tassos Senior Member

    None of the translations of ni can be used here, so you have to employ other ways in order to give the proper meaning.
    So
    Ni godinu dana ne radi ovde. - He works there for less than a year.
    Godinu dana ne radi ovde. - It's more than a year that he hasn't worked there.

    As for other languages go, in Greek if you invert the word order the first one can be translated word-by-word, while in the second one it's trickier (you have to change both the word order and the tense to present perfect and a couple of other things). In Italian word-by-word translation of the English sentences I gave you must work.
     
  7. Vanja Senior Member

    Serbian
    Ni godinu dana ne radi ovde ~ Not a year has passed since he was employed.
    Ni godinu dana nije radio ovde. ~ Not a year has passed since he left.

    You don't know if it is less/ whole/ more than a year, it's "about" a year.
     
  8. Tassos

    Tassos Senior Member

    More than a year means he hasn't worked there for a year and a day, a year and a week, a year and a month etc.
    About a year means he hasn't worked there for a year and a day, a year and a week, a year and a month but also 11 months, 11 months and 20 days or something like that. If you choose the second alternative, it sounds better like:

    He hasn't worked there for about a year.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013
  9. Vanja Senior Member

    Serbian
    Ne sitničarimo :D. Say a year, odokativno.
     

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