1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

Scheibe (Scheiße) !!

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by rob.returns, Aug 25, 2005.

  1. rob.returns

    rob.returns Senior Member

    Phil
    Philippines-English, tagalog, spanish, chavacano, tausog, visaya, ilonggo.
    :D HI to all. What kind of language is the word "SCHEIBE", is this German? What does it mean? I have seen a movie, and I think this is like a curse? Right?
     
  2. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Scheibe IS German. Mods, moving!


    As for the translation, I'd suggest:

    pane (Glasscheibe)
    slice (Scheibe Brot)
    disc (CD-Scheibe)
     
  3. la grive solitaire

    la grive solitaire Senior Member

    United States, English
  4. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Right, but Scheibe is a word itself as well. ;)
     
  5. la grive solitaire

    la grive solitaire Senior Member

    United States, English
    Of course it is, but it's not a curse.:D
     
  6. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Yes, it is a part of it. We can say "Scheibenkleister" (pronunciation: Sch... [indicating Scheiße]...eibenkleister)

    Meaning: Crap! Darn! Sugar! (Does that exist?)
    literal translation: Pane glue. :D
     
  7. rob.returns

    rob.returns Senior Member

    Phil
    Philippines-English, tagalog, spanish, chavacano, tausog, visaya, ilonggo.
    Thanks, Sheibe! I should have known. Thanks!
     
  8. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Wait a second—do you mean curse-word or euphemism? :)

    Gaer
     
  9. rob.returns

    rob.returns Senior Member

    Phil
    Philippines-English, tagalog, spanish, chavacano, tausog, visaya, ilonggo.
    I mean like F*CK, cursing, cussing. Is scheibe the german counterpart?
     
  10. Jana337

    Jana337 Senior Member

    čeština
    No, it is the other one mentioned above, with a "ß" instead of "b".

    Jana
     
  11. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    It may depend on where you read it. If you read it in BIG letters, you might see it like Scheibe:

    SCHEIßE (since there's no capital letter for ß)

    Maybe someone wrote it, but that wouldn't confuse anyone. The written ß is different from all letters.
     
  12. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Believe me, someone who is not very comfortable with German will very easyily think that SHEIBE=SHEIßE.

    You will not believe it. In fact, it's hard for me to believe it now, because they look totally different, but when I was starting, using weiB looking like a reasonable solution for weiß in the days when we could not use that character (it was not available). Natives screamend, "No, use 'ss'," and today I see why.

    But you never answered my question:

    Is Scheibenkleister a curse-word or a euphemism? To me it looks like the latter, much like "fudge" (for f***). ;)

    Gaer
     
  13. Jana337

    Jana337 Senior Member

    čeština
    I know this is a typo but it just looks like a splendid Germlish word. ;)
    Exactly, the Duden says
    Jana
     
  14. rob.returns

    rob.returns Senior Member

    Phil
    Philippines-English, tagalog, spanish, chavacano, tausog, visaya, ilonggo.
    BUt SHeiBE would be pronounced like it is written right? I think this would be a curse word, I have seen a movie that uses this word after a character died in an action.
     
  15. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Rob, You are talking about: :warn: Scheisse.

    The sound "ss" properly written as "ß" in many words, in German as used in Germany. In Switzerland, I believe "ß" does not exist, and "ss" is used instead.

    But "capital B" does not mean the same thing as "ß". I'm trying to understand your question. The point is that yes, :warn: Scheiße/Scheisse is a curse-word, but I don't particularly like typing it over and over again, since it is a curse-word.

    I assume you know the meaning, right? ;)

    If this is not clear, please PM and I'll explain it graphically to you. :)

    Gaer
     
  16. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    I would just like to second Gaer on the fact that it's very easy for someone not familiar with German to think of ß as a weird-looking B. I always wondered about it until I learned the language, and I have a friend who, having seen a sign in Germany, pronounced the name of a German street "Strabe."

    It may be second nature to Germans, but that's not necessarily the case for us learners. For example, I personally had to get used to writing that letter fluidly and naturally without pausing and/or producing an awkward-looking cross between ß and B.
     
  17. rob.returns

    rob.returns Senior Member

    Phil
    Philippines-English, tagalog, spanish, chavacano, tausog, visaya, ilonggo.
    Thanks Gaer. so the word means "F#ck!" in English. Yes or No?
     
  18. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    Well, sometimes.

    As with any other such word, the meanings and uses are copious.

    The straightforward definition is actually "shit," but many of its uses are better translated with other words in English.
     
  19. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    It also means "crap". But I totally have to agree with you and Gaer: We always see this word here and non-natives or people who don't know German could use that word over and over again, but this thread is actually like about "shit" or "fuck" in English.
     
  20. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    We probably should be marking some of these words with ":warn:".

    We are assuming that anyone reading here will clearly understand when and when not to use these words, but that may not always be the case, especially in German.

    For instance, :warn: "Scheiße" is a word I would advise people not to use, under any circumstances except when talking with a person or people they know very well, especially when such people do not speak German as their first language. The problem is, as always, that we can't avoid using words that may cause a problem (including extreme embarrassment) without knowing what they mean. ;)

    Gaer
     
  21. rob.returns

    rob.returns Senior Member

    Phil
    Philippines-English, tagalog, spanish, chavacano, tausog, visaya, ilonggo.
    Definitely, You couldn't be more precise Gaer.
     
  22. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Announcement to a moderator around here: Would you please re-name this thread to "Scheiße" with a :warning: in front of it. ;)
     
  23. Jana337

    Jana337 Senior Member

    čeština
    Ich hab beabsichtigt, es so zu lassen wie es ist. Aber wenn du meinst... Na gut. :)

     
  24. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    My suggestion:

    Change the thread to SCHEIBE. Seriously, it avoids the "no bad words in the title" rule, but it makes it much more obvious what the problem is.

    I agree with the rule about no offensive words in the titles. It's like a magnet for trouble. So far we are able to have open discussions about language that is potentially offensive. If we are not careful, we could lose that right.

    Gaer
     
  25. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    I agree. I suggest you (Jana) to use "Scheibe - maybe offensive?" And Gaer, I wouldn't spell it all in capital letters, since that ruins the atmosphere as well. ;)

     
  26. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    I'm aware of the general rule, but I thought in this unusual case it might be okay.

    But it's probably a stupid idea, because a search is going to find scheibe, no matter how it is spelled. ;)

    I don't think we have to mark the thread as offensive though. I'm not sure. I do think that :warn: marks are appropriate. Even in English a very offensive word might appear harmless to a non-native. I think the problem is worse in German, since fewer people know it. :)

    Gaer
     
  27. Jana337

    Jana337 Senior Member

    čeština
    The search thing is going to find the ß-word as well - if you do not restrict the search to thread titles, which is actually done by very few members (I suppose just by those who have a reason for it).

    Jana
     
  28. gaer

    gaer Senior Member

    Fort Lauderdale
    US-English
    Good to know, Jana. I have not used the search function for anything in quite some time. I should test it. :)

    Gaer
     

Share This Page