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Scientia vos liberabit?

Discussion in 'Lingua Latina (Latin)' started by linguos, Sep 22, 2012.

  1. linguos

    linguos Senior Member

    I want to say: "[You should learn diligently because only] the knowledge can/shall make you free"

    My guess for the second part is: Scientia vos liberabit - is it fine?

    As for the rest of the sentence, my current level doesn't allow me to even try translating it, so if someone found the time to do it, I would appreciate it. If not, then I'd happy with just the second part outside of the brackets. :)
     
  2. Hamlet2508 Senior Member

    English
    Depending on whether "you" is singular or plural

    sing. Diligenter studeas , cum (because + subjunctive) solum scientia te liberet.
    pl. Diligenter studeatis , cum solum scientia vos liberet !

    I think one might aim for the same subject in both main clause and subordinate clause and have "you should study diligently , because you are set free through/by means of knowledge"

    Thus, depending on whether "you" is singular or plural one would have

    sing. Diligenter studeas , cum (because + subjunctive) solum scientia libereris.
    pl. Diligenter studeatis , cum solum scientia liberemini !

    Then again, you might use "quod" or "quia" for because and then have either

    sing. Diligenter studeas , quia (because + indicative) solum scientia te liberat!
    pl. Diligenter studeatis , quia solum scientia vos liberat !

    or

    sing. Diligenter studeas , quiam (because + indicative) solum scientia liberaris!
    pl. Diligenter studeatis , quia solum scientia liberamini !

    There are various other ways of expressing the very same thought.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2012
  3. Scholiast Senior Member

    Reading, UK
    English - UK
    salue!

    As hamlet2508 declares:

    In keeping with the epigrammatic character of Latin aphorisms, it would be possible to leave the pronoun out altogether:

    scientia liberabit

    or indeed even more simply:

    scientia liberat

    All good wishes, Σ
     
  4. Stoicorum_simia Senior Member

    English (UK)
    But there is presumably an allusion to John 8:32, veritas liberabit vos, 'the truth will set you free'. So you might want to retain the pronoun. The quotation itself sometimes appears as veritas vos liberabit, conforming with more normal Latin word order.
     

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