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Scusi, potrebbe spostarsi per cortesia? Dovrei passare

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Bartolo76, Dec 9, 2009.

  1. Oddly, I could find any specific translation for the question under discussion. My personal try:

    I'm sorry, will you please step aside a bit? I should pass

    The context is a narrow place, crowded with people, where someone tries to get through rather in a hurry but not actually running.
    I'm looking for a colloquial but perfectly POLITE expression
    Thank you in advance for your help!
     
  2. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    Excuse me could you move (just) a little, please? I'm trying to get by.
     
  3. akhal Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Io direi:
    I beg your pardon, sir/madam, I would like to pass/to go in/to go out/to reach the.

    ma aspettiamo i madrelingua!
     
  4. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Excuse me, could you step aside just a bit. I need to pass. :)

    Eheh.. "I bet your pardon" è abbastanza formale (anche troppo, almeno per me) negli US, ma mi sa che va benissimo in Inghilterra!
     
  5. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    Ciao Brian, lovely weather isn't it?
    I agree that I beg your pardon in a crowded situation sounds overly polite.
     
  6. Natalisha Senior Member

    Russian
    Excuse me, can I get past? :)
     
  7. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    I would only use "step aside" if I was asking someone to resign from a position/post so I could replace them with someone else, but maybe that's an Australian thing. :)

    Asking someone to move sounds a bit rude to me. If it's not necessary to translate that literally I would just say, Could I please get through?/ Do you mind if I pass?
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2009
  8. Bookmom

    Bookmom Senior Member

    When I was living and working in Manhattan, it was perfectly acceptable on a crowded bus or subway to simply say "Getting off" or "This is my stop" while moving through the crowd.

    In other crowded situations, an airport terminal for example, I would simply say pardon me, excuse me, may I get by.

    I agree with Charles that step aside, no matter how I conjure it, sounds a bit rude.
     
  9. Aidone

    Aidone Senior Member

    Chicago
    U.S. English/Brooklyn
    Out, please.
     
  10. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Are you suggesting this as a translation? :confused:
     
  11. Aidone

    Aidone Senior Member

    Chicago
    U.S. English/Brooklyn
    Yes. I often use this in an elevator.
     
  12. byrne Senior Member

    Rome
    English - UK (Londoner)
    Sorry, do you mind if I just squeeze through / past?
     
  13. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Must be a NY thing. ;) I've never heard anything so curt, and if I did, I wouldn't consider it very polite, as Bartolo76 is looking for.
     
  14. Aidone

    Aidone Senior Member

    Chicago
    U.S. English/Brooklyn
    It is considered quite polite in my building or on the public buses. Maybe it's a Chicago thing, but the brevity is considered a plus. We don't like to waste words in a crowded bus or on a full elevator. In those situations time is of the essence and I think a phrase like "pardon me I have to get off here" would be considered acceptable but a little stuck up.
     
  15. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    I never heard it when I lived in Chicago, but I was a student and never awake early enough to be on the CTA buses during rush hour. :D

    But what you say makes sense. Except it only works in the context of a bus, elevator etc. Not, say, in a crowded hallway, a movie theater, a staircase or escalator, etc.
     
  16. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    I never use this expression in any situation! It sounds like someone trying to be refined. I think that generally it's enough to say "excuse me (please)" and people can see by your position and movements that you want to come through.
     
  17. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    That's because we consider the (traditional) BE accent to be (often overly) refined. :D I've never actually been to England, so my only knowledge of it comes from the movies, where things like "I beg your pardon, sir?!" sound like perfectly normal BE. ;)
     
  18. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    We only say "I beg your pardon?" in a situation where we haven't heard what someone has said, not if we want someone to move. I think it's probably the same in the UK. :)

    The most effective way of making a crowd divide like the Red Sea is to state in a very loud voice that you have Ebolavirus, or some other contagious disease causing death. ;)
     
  19. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Ah okay, so it is used, but just not in this context.
     
  20. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    It is, but most people say, "What?", or the more polite "Sorry?". :D We use "Excuse me?" for when we haven't heard what someone has said as well as when we want someone to move because we want to get through (without the question mark in the latter situation, of course :p).
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2009
  21. federicoft Senior Member

    Italian
    Even in Italian someone is much more likely to say just scusi or permette than the original phrase, which definitely sounds long-worded and verbose.
     
  22. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Or permesso!

    Yeah, in all actuality, before you could even finish the sentence Scusi, potrebbe..., the personal will have already moved, so you'd probably stop mid-way and say Grazie!
     

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