sentirsela di - sentirsi di

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by F4sT, Sep 20, 2005.

  1. F4sT

    F4sT Senior Member

    Venice
    Italy
    Hi, :)it's me again..
    how do you say in english "non me la sento"

    "non me la sento di abbandonarlo proprio ora" and when it's means ( non sono in vena di ..)
    tnx you very much in advance
     
  2. Scrumpals

    Scrumpals Senior Member

    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    USA - English
    possibly:
    "I don't feel like I can abandon him now"
    steven
     
  3. Manuel_M Senior Member

    Malta
    Maltese
    I don't feel like leaving him (it) at this time (forse at a time like this, ma dipende dal contesto.)
     
  4. moodywop Banned

    Southern Italy
    Italian - Italy
    "Non sono in vena di uscire stasera" = I don't feel like going out tonight(I'm not in the mood)

    In your example maybe "I don't feel I can..." sounds better:

    "I don't feel I can desert him now (that he needs me)"

    "I can't bear the thought of..."

    We're clearly talking about not letting down a friend in need here, not about not walking out on a lover, right?

    Carlo
     
  5. Jana337

    Jana337 Senior Member

    čeština
    Would "I haven't got the nerve to leave him" be too strong?

    Jana
     
  6. moodywop Banned

    Southern Italy
    Italian - Italy
    Manuel

    I like at a time like this. I hadn't thought of it. I think it's perfect.

    Carlo
     
  7. Manuel_M Senior Member

    Malta
    Maltese
    Thanks, Carlo.

    I'm unsure about my decision to go for leave to translate abandonare. What do people think?
     
  8. moodywop Banned

    Southern Italy
    Italian - Italy
    Jana

    Maybe it's a bit stronger, like "non ho il coraggio di".

    We still don't know whether it's a lover or a friend we're talking about. But "abbandonare" suggests it's a friend.

    "Anche la mia amica più cara mi ha abbandonato"

    "La mia ragazza mi ha lasciato"

    I wonder which hurts more.

    carlo
     
  9. Alfry

    Alfry Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    I think it perfectly fits the meaning.
     
  10. giacinta Senior Member

    Melbourne
    English
    Ciao a tutti,

    My dictionary refers to sentirsi as a verb that can be used (inter alia) in the sense of "essere disposto" di fare qualcosa. It says "sentirsi di fare qualcosa" and gives the example "non me la sento" ( I don't feel like it).

    My question relates to the "la".

    Shouldn't the verb in the infinitive be "sentirsela" similar to "cavarsela", "prendersela" "godersela" ( and also "farcela") in which the "la" is part of the construction?

    Giacinta
     
  11. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    It works like you said:

    Paul says that he doen't feel like walking till the shopping centre.
    Paul dice che non se la sente di camminare fino al centro commerciale.

    Paul is 95, it's not easy for him to feel like walking for a mile.
    Paul ha 95 anni, non è facile per lui sentirsela di camminare per un miglio.
     
  12. giacinta Senior Member

    Melbourne
    English
    Thanks for clearing that up Paul!
    Giacinta
     
  13. bayXSonic Senior Member

    Non me la sento di parlarle dopo quello che mi ha fatto.
    I would translate it with:
    I don't feel like talking to her after what she did to me.
    ... but I know that it means "non mi va di", that has a different meaning.

    Help?
     
  14. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    From OP:
    3. sentirsela (avere voglia) to feel like (di fare doing); (essere in grado) to feel up to (di fare doing); te la senti? do you feel up to it? non me la sento di andare a Londra, I’m not up to going to London.
     
  15. morgana

    morgana Senior Member

    In italiano, sentirsela e avere voglia hanno due significati ben distinti, non so se va bene tradurli entrembi con "feel like".

    Non me la sento = non ho il coraggio di farlo
    Non ne ho voglia = sono troppo pigro per farlo

    Any suggestion?
     
  16. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    I agree that "feel like" is not quite the same as "sentirsela". What about Oxford Paravia's "feel up to doing something"? Would it work in the original example: "I don't feel up to talking to her after what she did to me"? Can it convey the sense that you can't cope emotionally with the idea of doing something?
    Maybe "I just can't talk to her" or "I don't feel I can talk to her" would also work.
     
  17. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    This is one of those cases where in English a nice "just" can give the sentence a little extra flavor because, to be honest, I think "feel like" can work in both cases ("avere la voglia" and "sentirsela"). Also, context and intonation of the voice will let the listener know what the meaning is.

    A: Why don't you give her a call??
    B: No. I just don't feel like talking to her / I (just) don't feel up to talking to her / I just can't talk to her (right now).

    Given the context and the proper intonation, "I (just) dont feel like talking to her" will not be taken as "Non ho la voglia di parlarle." At least not to me. :)

    Another option: I just can't get myself to...
     
  18. merse0 Senior Member

    Verona
    Italy - Italian
    Non me la sento = non ho il coraggio di farlo

    I don't dare to do (something)
     
  19. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Ciao, mi dispiace ma non credo "to dare" possa andare. Di solito ha il senso di "non osare fare qualcosa" anziché "non avere il corraggio di fare qualcosa," per esempio:

    I won't/wouldn't dare call her = Non oserei chiamarla.

    ...il che è un po' diverso da "Non me la sento di chiamarla," no?
     
  20. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    I think "avere il coraggio" is only one of the possible senses of "sentirsela", which is more wide-ranging. I like Devoto Oli's definition:

    "avere la convinzione di trovarsi in uno stato fisico o psicologico che ci permetta di fare qualcosa"
     
  21. brian

    brian Senior Member

    Montréal
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Wait, question! When I read "Non me la sento di parlarle dopo quello che mi ha fatto," I get kind of a general sense that the speaker, in general, does not feel up to it, neither now nor in the near future. Of course, given proper context, it could specifically (and only) refer to the speaker's present feeling, but otherwise is there more generality to it?

    I ask because "to feel up to (doing) something" almost strictly refers to the present time and does not make any comment on the future. To say "I don't feel up to talking to her," at least to me, means "today/right now," but not necessarily "in general," even "after what she did to me."
     
  22. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Same as in Italian: "non le ma sento" means right now to me, no info about the future..
     
  23. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Well, I think that I would use "non me la sento di" mostly to refer to my present feeling, although, as you say, it depends on context. If I say "non me la sento di rivederla" I might be responding to someone who suggested I should meet up with her tomorrow or I might just be speaking in general about my unease at the thought of seeing her again, whether in the short term or even in the future in general.

    EDIT: Of course you can also use "sentirsela" in the future tense, as in this example from Google:

    Non me la sentirò mai di rinnegarli e, nondimeno, sarò sempre molto critico nei loro confronti

    Could you use "feel up to" here, or would you have to say "I will never be able to/have the courage to"?
     
  24. Sybil Vane Senior Member

    Daleville, AL
    Italian
    I agree with Brian!
    S.
     
  25. jbrahms61 Junior Member

    Modena (ITALIA)
    Italian
    Salve, vorrei sapere come poter tradurre in Inglese la seguente frase: "Non mi hai risposto adeguatamente, pertanto di acquistarlo non me la sento". Grazie.
     
  26. Claudio_it

    Claudio_it Senior Member

    Modena - Italy
    Italy-Italian
    Ci provo, ma aspetterei altre idee:
    You didn't answer properly so I don't feel up to buying it

    Madrelingua com'era??? Pessima? :)
     
  27. Lorena1970

    Lorena1970 Senior Member

    Italy, Italiano
    "You haven't answered me properly, so I don't feel like buying it."

    Credo sia corretto.
     
  28. neuromatico

    neuromatico Senior Member

    Toronto
    English (Canadian)
    From the Anglophone perpective,

    Sentiresela: An idiomatic way to express what you feel like doing.

    Faccio i compiti domani. Non me la sento stasera.
    I'll do my homework tomorrow. I don't feel like doing it tonight.
     
  29. Claudio_it

    Claudio_it Senior Member

    Modena - Italy
    Italy-Italian
    not feeling like something non è anche non aver voglia (di fare qualcosa)
     
  30. fox71

    fox71 Senior Member

    Pisa
    Pisa
    Infatti, Claudio, io ho sempre saputo che "feel like" significa "avere voglia di"...
    "Sentirsela" è molto diverso come significato! Ciao
     
  31. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    I don't feel up to something = non ce la farei (uno sforzo); qui non va bene.
    I don't feel like doing something = non ne ho voglia; d'accordo con gli altri che anche questo non va bene!

    You haven't given me an adequate reply, so I don't feel I can buy it.
     
  32. Dammivolume Senior Member

    Boston
    English-USA
    Scusate, but I dont see a clear difference between aver voglia di fare qualcosa vs sentirsela

    Is this correct? L'ho lasciata perche non me la sentivo piu'" ??
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 19, 2008
  33. Lorena1970

    Lorena1970 Senior Member

    Italy, Italiano
    "L'ho lasciata perché non me la sentivo più" é una frase tronca anche in Italiano.
    Si usa, ma non é così corretto dal mio punto di vista. In genere si specifica, oppure se si pronuncia tronca é perché segue un discorso precedente o una situazione nota.
    Questo è il mio modesto parere.

    In Inglese credo si possa dire:

    "I have broken up because I was bored"
    "I have broken up because I wasn't involved anymore"
    "I have broken up because I didn't feel like staying with her anymore"
     
  34. Dammivolume Senior Member

    Boston
    English-USA
    Tronca in che senso?

    L'ultima frase che hai scritto e' piu' corretta

    "I broke up with her, because I didnt want to be with her anymore" e' piu' comune.
     
  35. Lorena1970

    Lorena1970 Senior Member

    Italy, Italiano
    Tronca nel senso che sottintende qualcosa, una qualche ragione che magari é emersa precedentemente in altri discorsi o della quale l'interlocutore é già a conoscenza.
    Non é facile spiegare, ma ci provo: nel caso di "l'ho lasciata perché non me la sentivo più!" può essere sottinteso "di litigare", oppure "di passare il tempo con lei" oppure di condividerla con qualcun altro (nel caso ci sia in atto una doppia relazione da parte di lei) o qualsiasi altro motivo. Ma ci deve essere qualcosa di sottinteso.
    Diverso é "non ci sentivo più": "L'ho lasciata perché non ci sentivo più!" in questo caso "non sentirci" é equiparabile a "non essere più innamorati" "non essere più coinvolti come prima".
    E' comunque un' espressione riferibile a una sorta di "slang" giovanile, un po' gergale, diciamo non propriamente italiano corretto.
    "Ci sento una cifra!" oppure "Ci sento un:warn:casino:warn:!" Significa che qualcosa piace molto, dà emozione, esalta i sensi.
    Spero di aver chiarito. :)
     
  36. coolbrowne Senior Member

    Bethesda, MD - USA
    Português-BR/English-US bilingual
    Ciao,
    Si mi permettete, in America, "I don't feel up to something" vuol dire "non mi sento in grado di qualcosa" (pensate: "up to..." -> all'altezza di... -> non ci riesco...). Non so si sarebbe diverso in Inghilterra...

    Saluti
     
  37. You little ripper! Senior Member

    Australia
    Australian English
    Lorena, you can't break up by yourself in English. It must be done with someone else.

    "I broke up with him/her because I was bored"
    "I broke up with him/her because I no longer felt involved"
    "I broke up with him/her because I didn't feel like staying with her/him anymore" or

    "We broke up because I was bored"
    "We broke up because I no longer felt involved"
    "We broke up because I didn't feel like staying with him/her anymore"
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2008
  38. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    Sono d'accordo; è tanto diverso dire "non ce la farei"?
     
  39. Claudio_it

    Claudio_it Senior Member

    Modena - Italy
    Italy-Italian
    No, direi che è è la stessa cosa, "non sono in grado perchè non mi sento all'altezza" ha lo stesso significato di "non ce la farei (con uno sforzo)" come avevi detto tu qualche post fa.
    La differenza è con "non me la sento" quando non si ha intenzione di fare una cosa, magari perchè non si ritiene opportuno farla che, come ho imparato da questo post, si dice "I don't feel I can..."
    Ciao
     
  40. housecameron

    housecameron Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian/ Italy
    Non solo non l'ho mai sentita (come fitter.happier), ma "l'ho lasciata perché non ci sentivo più!" non la capirei neanche sforzandomi :rolleyes:
    Temo sia da sconsigliare :)
     
  41. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    "L'ho lasciata perché non ci sentivo più!" per me vuol dire che l'ho lasciata perché ero diventato sordo!:D:D
     
  42. Lorena1970

    Lorena1970 Senior Member

    Italy, Italiano
    Vi assicuro che è linguaggio gergale, non me la sono inventata. I giovani la usano parecchio.:)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 22, 2008
  43. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    Allora accettiamo quello che dici. E' fastidioso sentirti dire che un'espressione "non si dice" o "non è italiano" quando sai che esiste (io volevo essere spiritoso!).
     
  44. Angel.Aura

    Angel.Aura del Mod, solo L'aura

    Roma, Italia
    Italian
    A me fa lo stesso effetto.
    Mai sentita :confused:

    Forse si potrebbe forzare la mano e dire qualcosa tipo:
    "L'ho lasciata perché [nella relazione] non ci sentivo più quell'entusiasmo / amore / trasporto / qualcosa".
     
  45. SuperGaara Senior Member

    Venezia (Italy)
    Italian
    Oppure usando "sentire" come "provare": L'ho lasciata perchè non sentivo più nulla per lei

    Comunque può darsi sia un modo di dire della tua zona :)
     
  46. housecameron

    housecameron Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian/ Italy
    Mah..Einstein... può essere fastidioso solo fino a un certo punto.
    Fitter.happier ha 18 anni, SuperGaara 16.
    Quando un'espressione non si capisce o non è così diffusa bisogna dirlo senza farsi inutili problemi :)
     
  47. SuperGaara Senior Member

    Venezia (Italy)
    Italian
    Infatti non stiamo dicendo a Lorena che se l'è inventata, piuttosto stiamo ragionando sul fatto che non è di così immediata comprensione per tutti. E credo sia giusto metterlo in luce, dal momento che questo thread viene letto anche da chi sta imparando la lingua e potrebbe utilizzare quest'espressione in maniera non appropriata ;)
     
  48. sandona New Member

    Italian
    Hi there,
    I need somebody help.

    the sentence is:... ieri sera non me la sono sentita di abbandonare la riunione e tornarmene a casa.
    I translated it with: ....yesterday evening I didn't dare to leave the meeting and came back home.
    Is that correct?

    Thanks in advance
    Sandona
     
  49. coolbrowne Senior Member

    Bethesda, MD - USA
    Português-BR/English-US bilingual
    Ciano sandona. Press'a poco ;)
    Meglio: "returning", invece di "coming back". Un'altra cosa: "and came back home" sarebbe "e sono tornata a casa"

    Saluti :)
     
  50. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    Another possibility:
    ... yesterday evening I didn't feel I could leave the meeting and go/come home.

    I didn't feel I could... means that probably the meeting wasn't very interesting but it wouldn't have been right to leave it.
     

Share This Page