Serrucharle el piso a alguien

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by Artrella, May 20, 2005.

  1. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng
    Hola, "serrucharle el piso a alguien en el trabajo" por ejemplo... se dice "pull the rug under someone's feet"?

    Dañar el negocio, la movida, quitar el trabajo, o quitar algo. Ej : Tu asistente te quiere serruchar el piso.

    :)
     
  2. Gringosimo Senior Member

    Fort Worth, TX, EEUU
    USA English
    casi. :)

    Pull the rug out from under someone.


    :)
     
  3. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng


    Gracias Gringosimo!!! Eso es lo que necesitaba... la confirmación de un "nativo"!! :thumbsup: :p :thumbsup:
     
  4. Gringosimo Senior Member

    Fort Worth, TX, EEUU
    USA English
    It was my pleasure. :)
    ¿"Fue mi placer."?
     
  5. manana Senior Member

    Chile - Español
    Hola,

    Decimos "fue un placer"

    Saludos
     
  6. Gringosimo Senior Member

    Fort Worth, TX, EEUU
    USA English
    :) muchas gracias manana.
     
  7. Narda Senior Member

    Weston, Florida
    Guatemala
    Serruchar el piso is undermine somebody's efforts or work behind the screen in order to have him fired and then take over his job.

    I thought that pull the rug out from under someone is less specific, covers an array of situations:

    Like the parents that divorce all of a sudden pull the rug out from under the child's feet.

    Am I correct or not.
     
  8. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng

    Narda your definition of the expression in Spanish is perfect, you are right in that the English version is not that specific, but I don't think they have one for that particular situation.
     
  9. Narda Senior Member

    Weston, Florida
    Guatemala
    Yeap, I haven't heard one either. In Spanish there is another one for the same situation: "Le hizo la casita". Have you heard that? My former boss, from Spain used it once or twice.
     
  10. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng

    No, I've never heard that. Instead we say "le hizo la cama"... ;)
     
  11. Narda Senior Member

    Weston, Florida
    Guatemala
    True, I had forgotten about that one.

    Do you think that reflects the kind of beings we are???
     
  12. Gringosimo Senior Member

    Fort Worth, TX, EEUU
    USA English
    "To pull th rug out from under someones feet" is used to express a situation where someone takes a loss because someone else did something to affect their circumstances. So, it is a very general concept.

    I'll try to give an example to see if it helps...

    Toms parents told him they would give him money for the downpayment on a car but after he had ordered the car and filled out all the paperwork at the dealership they pulled the rug out from under his feet by changing their mind causing him to lose the money he had already put down.

    hope it helps. :)
     
  13. Gringosimo Senior Member

    Fort Worth, TX, EEUU
    USA English

    I was just thinking....sounds like someone "stuck a knife in his back".
     
  14. Narda Senior Member

    Weston, Florida
    Guatemala
    Dear Artrella, unfortunately, I think so too.
     
  15. Narda Senior Member

    Weston, Florida
    Guatemala
    You know what? It is true, except that: Le metió un cuchillo por la espalda refers to all kinds of treason.

    A good friend that rattles his/her friends secret le mete un cuchillo por la espalda.

    The same friend makes fun of the other, se siente como si le hubieran metido un cuchillo por la espalda.
     
  16. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng

    "Clavar el puñal por la espalda" in Argentina, meaning "betrayal"
     
  17. Gringosimo Senior Member

    Fort Worth, TX, EEUU
    USA English
    A knife in the back in AE is also betrayal. If a friend of mine stuck a knife in my back (figuratively ;) ) they would no longer be my friend. I suppose it can be used in a joking sense as well but I haven't heard it that way as far as I can recall.
     
  18. Chaucer Senior Member

    US inglés/español
    He aquí otras opciones que encajarían dentro de ciertos contextos:

    to horn in on someone o to horn in on something o to horn in on something of/belonging to someone

    Your assistant wants to horn in on you[r job]. Quitarte el trabajo, hacerte a lado.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Si les digo que está mal la traducción, pueden pensar que quiero "serruchar el piso" al traductor.

    If I tell them the translation is bad, they might think I'm trying to horn in on the translator['s job/ position/turf]. Quitarle o minarle el terreno al traductor.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
  19. cubaMania Senior Member

    Que yo sepa no tenemos equivalente en inglés para serruchar el piso. Me parece que lo mejor sería expresar en inglés los dos elementos: undermine someone in order to take their job.

    From Jerga de Panamá:

    From dictionary.cambridge.org:
    Also from dictionary.cambridge.org:
    And to undermine:
     
  20. Artrella Banned

    BA
    ARGENTINA Sp/Eng
    Thank you Chaucer, I think your phrase is what I need, although Teacher taught me "pull the rug..", but I prefer "to horn in..." :thumbsup:

    Thanks CubaMania and Gringosimo! :thumbsup:
     
  21. Gringosimo Senior Member

    Fort Worth, TX, EEUU
    USA English
    That's a good one Chaucer! Haven't heard it in forever but it's a perfect fit for the translation. :)
     
  22. fabita New Member

    Argentina
    spanish
    Gracias Artrella!!!
     
  23. fabita New Member

    Argentina
    spanish
    gracias Artrella!!
     

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